Jump to content

DONT STAY LURKING AS A GUEST,

JOIN TEF AND BENEFIT FROM MEMBERSHIP:

CLICK HERE TO JOIN.
  •  
     
     
Countdown To Christmas!
 

 

Does anyone know anything about Microwave Ovens ?


sanny

Recommended Posts

My microwave recently packed in so i did a few tests and found the power diode to be at fault

my oven seems to have two....one from the capacitor to the chasis and the other across the terminals of the capacitor

i replaced the one to the chasis with one i bought from fleabay..im pretty sure it was the one across the terminals that was causing the problem so i removed it completely and now the microwave works fine

i was wondering if anyone knows the purpose of this diode as not all microwaves have one across the terminals of the capacitor

Thanks in advance :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites
 

Yes!

I know summat about microwave ovens.

You put stuff in `em, turn em on, and they go "ding" when its ready.

I KNOW that isn`t what you wanted, but it`s all I`m prepared to say to someone who has effectively re-designed the mag. control circuit of a microwave.

Not all households have an earth rod; doesn`t mean none of `em NEED one, does it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites
 

It's a shunt diode. The other is a rectifier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites
 
 
SPECIAL LOCATION

All I know is a general rule of thumb....

Manufactures are stingy cost cutting sods.....

And if something is NOT needed they don't normally go to the expense of fitting it in the first place...

If it is already fitted....

It most probably performs some important function!;):Salute

Link to comment
Share on other sites
 

The shunt diode protects the transformer in the case of a faulty rectifier, it wont effect its function by removal, old and cheap models probably wont have them. If the rectifier goes O/C and produces AC instead of DC it can damage the transformer as the fuse may not blow, the shunt diode is there to go S/C and blow the fuse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites
 

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of UseWe have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.