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Isolator Switch


woody264

Question

Does a isolator socket need to go through a mcb ?

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20 answers to this question

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Thanks for your reply, this is what I'm saying, they have put power straight into the isolator socket which then goes into the 25amp rccd , I would have thought that the power should have gone straight into the rccd first and the isolator socket should have had its own separate protection .

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It could be a RCBO....

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As I have said, the over current protection will be wired into the circuit that feeds the socket into which you plug these portable toilets. It is not really your concern other than if the socket you are offered looks obviously dodgy then refuse to plug your units into it.

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Thanks for your reply, this is what I'm saying, they have put power straight into the isolator socket which then goes into the 25amp rccd , I would have thought that the power should have gone straight into the rccd first and the isolator socket should have had its own separate protection .

 

i still dont have any idea what you are talking about. and as ive already said, an RCD does not give any overload protection

 

try drawing out what they have done

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^^^^^^

I'm with Andy

I have NO idea what is going on,

seems loads of terminology being used wrong, either that or its a disaster,

it seems to change with each post.

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This thread demonstrates the "a little knowledge is dangerous" point very well.

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Is this not a portable toilets set up for events and supplied via a generator, which would have the necessary protection within?

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define what an "isolator socket" is please?

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hi its like one of these

ebay item number

261544679849
 
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Yes, I would expect that to wired as a radial circuit from a 16A MCB.

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I'm using a rccb 25 amp would this be any good or does it need to have its own 16 amp rcd

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So it does have to be protected ?? Cause at the moment they have it wired straight from the power.

They have 240v going straight into the socket shown and then from there it goes into the top of the 25amp rccd. This then feeds power to the board where they loop the power into a 16 amp mcb and from there to a transformer to power some 12v lights. I've looked at it and there seems to be no protection for that socket cause when I turn off the rccd and the mcb there is still power to the socket which is why I'm asking the question .

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You don't describe things very clearly

 

"they have it wired straight from the power"

 

what does that mean?

 

It should come from it's own circuit from the consumer unit with a 16A MCB. Anything else is wrong.  It sounds like a right lashed together bodge of an installation.

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I'm using a rccb 25 amp would this be any good or does it need to have its own 16 amp rcd

 

it needs suitable overload protection. the 25a rating on an RCCD is simply the current it can safely handle, it does NOT offer any overload protection. maybe go get a refund from your short course

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Yes this is not my work it's something that I've came across, it's on the back of some portable toilets . Each toilet has its own 12v light in . All the electric is on the back of the toilets . When these are taken to site the are plugged straight into power via a surface socket on the back.

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So when they are used, whoever installs them should ensure the socket they plug into is adequately protected by a suitable mcb.

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Yes this is not my work it's something that I've came across, it's on the back of some portable toilets . Each toilet has its own 12v light in . All the electric is on the back of the toilets . When these are taken to site the are plugged straight into power via a surface socket on the back.

 

there should NEVER be a socket to connect to a supply elsewhere. there may be a plug, but a socket is very dangerous, and the lead to attach it is more commonly known as a widow maker. im sure you can figure out why its called that

 

of course, it doesnt help giving almost no information, of which it would appear most of it is wrong anyway, and then expecting a proper answer

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Hi Woody,

 

Not being funny but it appears that you do not know the difference between an RCCB or an MCB.

 

You need to get someone who does..

 

john..

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Hi yes I'm not a electrician it's just something I've seen on site and was asking the question.

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Hi Woody,

 

Portable buildings/ units are classed as a "special location" and there are various more onerous than usual regulations that apply to such things. But to answer your questions, yes the suppy to the toilets should be fed through a suitable MCB and not just connected "to the mains" "directly" if you follow me, and yes, it must also be fed through an RCD as well. [socket under 32A and also one that is going to be used outdoors] and there are certain special requirements concerning the type of earthing of the installation it is all fed from and also earthing arrangements of the unit/building/toilets themselves. It is all a bit specialised for DIY type work, and you will not have the testing equipment you need anyway.

 

Oh, and the toilets cannot be fitted with a socket for the power to "go into" they need a thing called an appliance inlet if you intend that they are going on the end of an extension lead which is what i think you mean..

 

john...

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