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Bonding Gone Mad


SLIPSHOD & SLAPDASH

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I am sure we have all seen instances of this, the 15th edition or the misunderstanding of,  is to blame for a lot of it.  Anyhow, let me start off with this i saw at the weekend

 

post-16-0-71374400-1433787609_thumb.jpg

Its one of the two legs of the London eye

 

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Seen plenty of boilers where ALL the pipes entering the bottom are bonded together.

 

And the old practice of a bond onto a kitchen sink.

 

I would have expected if anything to see a big flat strip of copper as a lightening conductor if anything. I can't imagine that "joint" actually flexes very much?

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I could understand a lightning conductor

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There was a bond like this on each of the 2 legs, looked like 25mm

post-16-0-74870900-1433788385.jpg

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i dont think that little bit of copper is going to match the large lump of steel.... unless it has rubber bushes, but it doesnt look like it

 

same with the boilers - all connected inside boiler anyway, no point in it

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saw similar on a railway bridge. was messy like that too! never noticed bonding on bridges before :C

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I am sure we have all seen instances of this, the 15th edition or the misunderstanding of,  is to blame for a lot of it.  Anyhow, let me start off with this i saw at the weekend

 

attachicon.gif2015-06-06 18.27.00.jpg

Its one of the two legs of the London eye

 

Busman's holiday was it?  :lol:

 

Wouldn't be to do with static reduction would it?

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Who said it was bonding?? Might be a way of trying to reduce galvanic corrosion/pitting of bearing surfaces...

 

john...

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As OnOff's post ....I bet its to do with static.

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not needed for the one in Manchester,

its gonna get impounded if the owners dont get it moved in a hurry,   :slap

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Shock absorbers? they look springy enough.

Or perhaps last resort restraining cables, in case the main ones fail they look just long enough to stop the punters getting wet. :)

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I believe the technical term for these wires is "talking points".  :tongue in cheek

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It cant be for bonding as none of the connections had the 'Safety electrical connection' etc  label.

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Good point.. good point.......

 

What about "modern art"??? Might be that....

 

john....

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm veering towards Apprentice's  galvanic protection /  cathodic protection  type thing .  

 

The main gas network uses cathodic protection on their steel pipes , stops them rusting . 

 

Reminds me of something my dad told me about .   Apparently  ships become magnetised like giant compass needles ,  and will attract magnetic mines to them  ,  and also enable them to be detected as " bend" the Earth's field, so they carry out "Degaussing  "    (My spelling)     by draping cables over the side  (Possibly with AC passing through them , just  guessing  )  

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My Dad was on MTBs during the Whoarrrrrrr. I remember him telling me something about deqgaussing as it upset the torpedos and some other stuff

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