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Spur Scocket


Doodledog

Question

I have a spured scocket in my loft, but I want to create a small ring main using this spur. Can I wire a fused spur from this spured scocket then wire a 3 double scocket ring main from this? Thanks

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25 answers to this question

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Change the existing scocket to a fused spur, then add as many scockets as you like, not as a ring main.

This is of course assuming the existing socket (sorry scocket ) isn't already a spur off of a spur or the existing scocket circuit isn't a radial.....

Awaiting the "what's a radial" question.

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I have an other problem the 13amp scocket said that are in my new home have 4 fixing screws and are imperial threads. To save me the trouble of changing the boxes as the decor is good enough to keep at this time, does anyone know if I can buy new 13amp scocket said that have 4 fixings?

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Just break the top and bottom fixings off, get a 3.5mm tap from electrical wholesalers or Screwfix and tap the left and right lugs, job should be a good un unless the backbox is a grossly different size which I doubt.

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I seem to recall that imperial threads 4BA were larger than M3.5

Why not reuse the 4BA screws in the side lugs...if the box has them, not all do.

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I seem to recall that imperial threads 4BA were larger than M3.5

Why not reuse the 4BA screws in the side lugs...if the box has them, not all do.

That is correct. You have the old MK sockets from aprox 1964. Metric screws generally will be ok but if loose re use the old ones in the side fixings. Any new socket will fit these old boxes but Check the top and bottom fixings dont foul the new socket, if so then snap off by twisting off with a pair of pliers

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That's always providing that they weren't the MK boxes with the sockets that had 4 screws 2 top 2 bottom, and none in the sides, they did exist...

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I assume there is 50 year old wiring to the socket. What sort of fuses are in the "fusebox"? Do you re-wire them when they blow?

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I have a spured scocket in my loft, but I want to create a small ring main using this spur. Can I wire a fused spur from this spured scocket then wire a 3 double scocket ring main from this? Thanks

 

 

The purpose of a ring circuit is to allow higher currents down a circuit that uses cable of a lower capacity. Parallel paths permit this. Using a fused spur (max current 13A) and 2.5mm CSA twin & earth cable makes a ring circuit overkill and a waste of duplicated cable. A radial will be more than adequate. Many uneducated DIY'ers do seem to think that sockets must be wired as a ring, this is a myth.

 

Doc H.

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Thanks to all for advice. The sockets have 4 screws holding the switch 2 top and 2 bottom. I have tried to google new sockets with 4 screw holes but can not find any on the Internet. They are MK sockets.

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Thanks to all for advice. The sockets have 4 screws holding the switch 2 top and 2 bottom. I have tried to google new sockets with 4 screw holes but can not find any on the Internet. They are MK sockets.

You will not get 4 hole sockets anymore

Turn off the electric

Loosen socket

See if there are side lugs....as. Mentioned above

If not then this is the time to strat learning how to patch plaster when you have swapped the boxes, sorry.

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Thanks to all who have took the time to help me. I have my fingers and toes crossed in the hope there arms side lugs.

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If you have no side lugs you could try fixing these over the existing boxes then fit a normal socket

http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/MKK2202.html

The 4 holes won't line up with the holes in the sockets/existing boxes though AFAIK.

It is possible to change metal back boxes without re-plastering, patience is a virtue (that I don't have these days), but it can be done, I have done it and seen it done.

This is one of those PITA jobs.

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This is where a multimtool comes in handy, along with lots of black coffee and patience

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If there is no side lugs what about the old trick of drilling 2.5mm holes in the back of the back box and then tap the 3.5mm threads and then a couple of long reach screws, jobs a good un and no chopping out of back boxes.

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2.5mm is too small for M3.5 tapping! ;)

Tapping drill for M3.5 x 0.6 which is standard M3.5 is 2.9mm, try taping a 2.5mm dia hole with an M3.5x0.6 tap and you'll have issues.

Which could result in a broken tap, not a good plan...

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Whoops yip go for 2.9 mm or 2.5 with a wiggle then:) still think the idea has potential though.

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I know that 0.4mm does not sound a lot roys, but when you are getting down to these sizes it actually is, the hole is about 15% too small for the tap.

Take that as a 15% overload in a cable vs the OCPD and everyone would be up in arms! ;)

Plus, the tip of even a full taper tap would be too large to start the thread.

I know I do too much clanky stuff too!

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The 4 holes won't line up with the holes in the sockets/existing boxes though AFAIK.

It is possible to change metal back boxes without re-plastering, patience is a virtue (that I don't have these days), but it can be done, I have done it and seen it done.

This is one of those PITA jobs.

I know the holes won't line up with the existing, but the fixing holes on the plate can be drilled and fixed through the opposite corners in the back box. Put a bit of sleeving over the screws to eliminate sharp edges it's a lot less mess than changing the box

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I know the holes won't line up with the existing, but the fixing holes on the plate can be drilled and fixed through the opposite corners in the back box. Put a bit of sleeving over the screws to eliminate sharp edges it's a lot less mess than changing the box

So what are you proposing that the holes line up with?

You are going to drill them to match what?

Why sleeve?

 

I'm not picking holes, it's just that your statements don't add up to me.

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A bit of gripfill should do the trick with that backplate thingie. 

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So what are you proposing that the holes line up with?

You are going to drill them to match what?

Why sleeve?

 

I'm not picking holes, it's just that your statements don't add up to me.

The fixing plate has 4 fixing holes in the corners, in the corner of the back box drill through the back put a rawl plug then screw the plate back into the rawl plug. The sleeving over the screw does away with the sharp edge of the thread in the box. I have used this method before where the side lugs were broken off of a box in a polished plaster wall where taking the box out wasn't an option.

I'm sorry I can't explain it simpler than that hope that adds up now

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Right now I see, OK, not something I would do, but, not saying it can't be done and done well.

I suppose it depends on the masonry behind the box though also?

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That's true it does depend on the masonry but if the masonry isn't up to scratch use a self tapper through the box instead.

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