Jump to content

DONT STAY LURKING AS A GUEST,

JOIN TEF AND BENEFIT FROM MEMBERSHIP:

CLICK HERE TO JOIN.
  • 0

Power And Lights In Shed


Captain Newtron

Question

I am wanting to put power and lights in to my new shed. It is 30 meters from the house and will need 40 meters of cable to reach from the main supply under the stairs to the shed fuse board. It will run under the floor pass through wall to the garden, be pinned to the garden wall to the shed and the in through the shed wall to the fuse box. I will have four lights and about 8 double sockets in the shed, and have been told that 6mmSWA 2core is what I need, some advice on the cable and thing to look out for would be appreciated.

Cheers

Captain Newtron

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recommended Posts

Ok

I get it, not for the DIYer then. What about the names of any Part P in the Cheshire West and Chester self certification scheme to get in contact with to price  up the job and advise me. Thanks for all your help.

 

Cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where abouts are you Captain?

Im in Prestatyn, North Wales and occasionally work in Chester...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hartford, Northwich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

need a lot more than that... 8 double socket could have a 8w light in each, or a 2kW heater in each. then there is earthing type etc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am wanting to put power and lights in to my new shed. It is 30 meters from the house and will need 40 meters of cable to reach from the main supply under the stairs to the shed fuse board. It will run under the floor pass through wall to the garden, be pinned to the garden wall to the shed and the in through the shed wall to the fuse box. I will have four lights and about 8 double sockets in the shed, and have been told that 6mmSWA 2core is what I need, some advice on the cable and thing to look out for would be appreciated.

Cheers

Captain Newtron

 

 

Ask your sparky?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

i thought he had asked the same thing, but quick look at his previous posts / threads didnt show it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

 

TO expand on Andy's post :

 

Unless you actually want to provide a simply ludicrous amount of power availability to cover every possibility (e.g. a 2KW electric heater in each of your 2x8 sockets) you need to make a realistic assessment of the total power (Sockets and Lights and hot tubs etc.) you actually need in the shed now and in the foreseeable future.  The cable calculation then needs to consider voltage drop too as there are regulations about how much it can fall under load.

 

On a long cable this often means limiting the maximum current flowing in the SWA cable to considerably less than it's 'sticker' current capacity and permanently enforcing that situation with protective breakers at each end.  Earthing also needs careful and proper consideration as do the regulations concerning installing new circuits and how you are going to to test the installation.

 

I very strongly recommend getting a qualified and properly equipped electrician in to do it (and that's not the one who said '6mmSWA' unseen)

 

HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ooh 2core armoured, NICE !

 

No EARTH then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ooh 2core armoured, NICE !

 

No EARTH then.

What do you mean "no earth"?

Its SWA, of course you can have an earth with a 2 core, the SWA can act as the earth / cpc / bonding conductor, within a few very limited constraints.

It is VERY rare that the SWA of an armoured is non-compliant under the regs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hartford, Northwich

So you're only an hour away then.. I could come and have a look for you next Saturday if you like?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ooh 2core armoured, NICE !

 

No EARTH then.

 

erm.. you do know its common practice to use the armour as the earth, dont you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

erm.. you do know its common practice to use the armour as the earth, dont you?

I'm a vet, but I know that....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WHAT,?! 

The armour is really the earth?

That's a bit rough, do you have to put a block connector on every strand,?  ;) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

no steps, you have to paint it with corrosion inhibitor first :slap

 

I'm still a fan of 2 core, it's cheaper and easier to work with. Confused me when I first saw a whole system done that way though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm puzzled now though,

I've got a single.phase supple to my shed wired in 4core SWA, what should I do with the 2 extra cores,? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Double up?

 

Switch outside lighting?

 

PME it :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Double up?

 

Switch outside lighting?

 

PME it :D

:slap

I love it when the only constructive answer comes from a cat fiddler,  :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Double up?

Switch outside lighting?

PME it :D

make it a ring final?

:lol:

I think it is more common to use 3c as it saves workinout the CSA of the armour!?

:C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why don't you pull out the two spares cores as not needed and cash in for scrap!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You won't get much for your efforts though..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suspect it was left over

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CSA of the armour does not come into it [with one exception] The only reason someone would NOT use the armour as CPC, is either because R2 for the cable would be too high, or they are too stupid to be able to make off glands..

 

Why would you NOT use the armour as CPC, especially as it has to be earthed at the supply end anyway....

 

john..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slave door bell?

Bell rings, slave comes to........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of UseWe have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.