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Distance Between A Building And An Overhead Power Line?


ProDave
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I'm trying to help somebody out.

 

When erecting a building close to an overhead power line (11KV single phase in this case) the DNO here (SSE) advise you that you cannot build less than 9 metres from the line, or more correctly they request you contact them.

 

when you do contact them they verbally said the actual limit is 6 metres, but if you are building between 6 and 9 metres from the line they want to discuss and agree with you things like scaffold, diggers and cranes.

 

My question is what statutory documents are in force here? where is the actual legislation that sets the 6 (or 9) metre limit, what does it actually say?

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I don't know where the docs are Dave, so I can't help you there,

But, I did do a job once where it was pretty close to the overheads and DNO came out to say where scaffold etc could go, the guy was all good about it, no big dramas or I am the law sort of attitude, he just wanted to make sure everything was being done in a sensible way.

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The ESQCR.

 

See Part 5 and the Schedules at the end:

 

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2002/2665/contents/made


I think the issue is that with 6m that assumes that whatever is in proximity to the lines is fixed whereas a crane, scaffold poles etc are long...........erm.........swingy things...........

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That's helpful OnOff, but it really only makes the statement "ordinarily accessible"

 

Where it defines that as :

 

 "In this regulation the expression “ordinarily accessible” means the overhead line could be reached by hand if any scaffolding, ladder or other construction was erected or placed on, in, against or near to a building or structure."

 

IT does not give any specific dimensions, or even what reach from a set of scaffold is considered "ordinary"

 

Obviously the DNO here are playing sate with 6 metres, even a 2 metre wide (unusually wide) scaffold would leave you 4 metres from the line which would not be "ordinarily accessible"

 

But the question this is trying to solve is looking for a specific legal minimum separation between a newly to be build building and an existing overhead line.

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How close does he want to get with a the scaffold?

You know electricity can jump ;) especially in damp inclement weather..... which I guess you see a fair bit of up in the land of freedom

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It's someone who has got planning permission to build an extension just 2 metres from the power line. Obviously that's too close as that will definitely be "ordinarily accessible" from the scaffold.

 

His gripe is the first he knew about it is when the timber frame company pointed it out. The foundations are already in.

 

He believes his architect should have noticed the cable and advised it needs moving or undergrounding first. but to prove negligence he wants something specifying an actual minimum distance.

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I'm on holiday atm but I can try to do some investigation for you next week Dave.

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Thanks that would be appreciated.

 

P.S I don't know who the DNO is in this case, it's not local to me.

Edited by ProDave
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architect probably has some clause of 'if i dont see anything on site that a problem such a power line or a river running through the property, its not my fault and you will have to pay for the mistake'

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I'm on holiday atm but I can try to do some investigation for you next week Dave.

I'm on holiday atm but I can try to do some investigation for you next week Dave.

Do you not take all,your notes and regs books with you!

I don't think your heart is really in it!.............( looks for sarcastic smiley, but ipad says NO)

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Not sure if it the architects responsibility to spot this.

Was a builder involved or has the property owner being acting as PM, SM, QS etc?

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P13 there suggests minimum 3 metres and Fig 1 on P22 shows how you measure that clearance.  So at last a figure.  Based on that he might not be far from complying.

Edited by ProDave
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Just a glorified draftsperson, numpties most of them......

Well this is one of the truest things I've heard you say for a while!!

Come to think of it it's the first thing I've heard you say for a while?? :o

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On 03/09/2015 at 15:41, ProDave said:

I'm trying to help somebody out.

 

When erecting a building close to an overhead power line (11KV single phase in this case) the DNO here (SSE) advise you that you cannot build less than 9 metres from the line, or more correctly they request you contact them.

 

when you do contact them they verbally said the actual limit is 6 metres, but if you are building between 6 and 9 metres from the line they want to discuss and agree with you things like scaffold, diggers and cranes.

 

My question is what statutory documents are in force here? where is the actual legislation that sets the 6 (or 9) metre limit, what does it actually say?

Slightly different question is can you site a steel shipping container underneath a high voltage low height power line? Does the 6m or 9m rule come into play? We're in SSE land... worried about the comment electricity jumps... any thoughts or advice appreciated.

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I thought post #1  sounded familiar  ,  then I saw Steptoe's name ,  then I saw the thread date   2015 .  

It,s still an interesting thread though .   

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4 hours ago, worried... said:

Slightly different question is can you site a steel shipping container underneath a high voltage low height power line? Does the 6m or 9m rule come into play? We're in SSE land... worried about the comment electricity jumps... any thoughts or advice appreciated.

if you did, you wouldn't need any leccy for the flourescent tubes to work :D.

 

They build houses under powerlines, so why not a shipping container.

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An overhead line will be high enough that it is safe for a road legal vehicle to drive underneath, so think double decker bus.  Your shipping container won't be that tall.

 

BUT and it is a BIG BUT any crane or hiab used to lift it WILL come very close to the power lines. No crane driver worth his salt would even attempt it.

 

You might be able to get it there with a large fork lift and not lifting it very high?

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