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Uk Fuse Box


loydE

Question

Hi can anyone tell me if my fuse box is acceptable here in the uk. Just im having a new kitchen fitted and the builder is saying it needs updating and changing out for new. The fuse box is fitted with MCBs ranging from 6amp upto 40amp. I can email you a photo if anyone can give me any advice? Thanks

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20 answers to this question

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Andy™

if its old and no RCD's then it doesnt fully comply and if he is modifying the wiring then some parts may need updated. are the MCBs you have plug in ones or not?

 

an admin can upgrade your account later so you can post images

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Talk Electrician Forum

Hi can anyone tell me if my fuse box is acceptable here in the uk. Just im having a new kitchen fitted and the builder is saying it needs updating and changing out for new. The fuse box is fitted with MCBs ranging from 6amp upto 40amp. I can email you a photo if anyone can give me any advice? Thanks

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Andy™

see answer in your other thread...

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ProDave

Just to add many CU's with just MCB's can be updated with rcbo's for new or modified circuits.

 

But it is always worth considering a CU upgrade, it's not usually a hugely expensive job (a lot less than you will be spending on the kitchen) so worthwhile for peace of mind.

 

you are best getting a local electrician to do it.  As you may read on here, a lot of the horror stories of poor wiring are the result of kitchen fitters doing wiring.

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Hi the mcb are the push in type into the old cream coloured fuse box..

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Andy™

Hi the mcb are the push in type into the old cream coloured fuse box..

 

RCD's can be added externally, but it may be better long term to replace it with one with built in RCDs

 

now is this kitchen fitter doing the electrics himself (usually a bad idea), or getting a sparky to do it? if its the first, you'd be best telling him he's not touching the electrics and get someone else in

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Hum... I would recommend you get a local spark or two to quote to change the CU before the kitchen work is done. The person doing the CU change should provide you with a completed EIC and also deal with the LABC Part P notification.

 

The person doing the kitchen works should then also give you certificates covering the circuits changed (1 minor works per circuit)

 

Hope this helps.

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Thanks gents, any idea on cost to upgrade and fit a new upto date fuse box with rcds, obviously by a qualified electrician. .

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SLIPSHOD & SLAPDASH

 That depends where you are and how many circuits.  £400 is a starting price

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Hang on a minute - "the builder is saying it needs replacing".

What qualifications does he have to make this decision?

Was any testing done?

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8 circuits..derby..he said the fuse box is the old bakerlite type with mcbs pushed in...

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Was any testing done?

I ask because if a CU change is going to take place how is this builder sure that the wiring is satisfactory for continued use. The whole installation could be a write off then you have an electrician that cannot turn your electric back on because it is dangerous to do so.

Is the earthing satisfactory?

All this needs to be looked at before anyone just says -" looks old mate?"

Recommending a CU change just because of a new kitchen is only partially good advice. There are other things that need to be considered.

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Yes he said the earthing will need updating in the kitchen by the electrician. The house was built in 1985 by david Wilson.

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Andy™

if earthing was done correctly when the house was built, id expect it to be satisfactory

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This stinks if you ask me. I would not be listening to a builder on advice on earthing and CU changes.

Earthing to waterpipes

Have you any documentation from this guy or has he just walked around pointing at stuff?

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This stinks if you ask me. I would not be listening to a builder on advice on earthing and CU changes.

 

 

I wouldn't be so fast to judge!

 

I work with guys who will give "such" advice, then get me to come and look at the installation properly - and then I will make a proper judgement and talk to the client directly

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I wouldn't be so fast to judge!

 

I work with guys who will give "such" advice, then get me to come and look at the installation properly - and then I will make a proper judgement and talk to the client directly

Let's hope this is the case here then.

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ProDave

It could be anything from a straightforward half day CU swap and testing to a very long day fixing loads of faults.

 

Get a local electrician or 2 to come and have a look and give you an estimate.

 

How long have you lived there? Has it been mucked about with or is it original?

 

I see anything from a 1960's install that's still as neat and perfect as the day it was fitted and no faults (apart from things now need updating to current regs) to 15 year old houses that have been so mucked about by a DIYer that you have lots of faults to fix

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Doc Hudson

Earthing to water pipes

 

I would think it is bonding to water pipes not earthing. A very high proportion of builders, kitchen fitters and bathroom fitters know less than the average 5 year old about how to do satisfactory wiring. There is a small minority who either do know themselves or work in partnership with a good electrician who does all of their electrics for them. Either way, you are under no obligation to use a builder or his choice of electrician for any electrical work required for a building project. As with any purchase it is always prudent to check more than one supplier to compare costs and what you actually get for your money. If you can get another local electrician to come round and assess your job re what is actually needed and an estimate of the cost I am sure you would benefit from it.

 

Doc H.

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