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Armeg UK

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kerching
10 hours ago, Armeg UK said:

Acceler8%

All holesaws should be like this

 

I could not believe how good they were

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Barx
1 hour ago, kerching said:

All holesaws should be like this

 

I could not believe how good they were

 

I concur, Love 'em

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binky
On 12/4/2017 at 09:37, Armeg UK said:

Mornin' TEF.

Just a quick heads up on our December competition that we're running over on Twitter. If any of you guys are lucky enough to win anything, let us know on this thread :)

 

 

 

 

Ooooh shiny new tools :happybunny:

 

I'll have to resurrect the twitter account - your sales and marketing should understand most trades people seem to be over 40ish and don't really do twitter - especilly on here :slap

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Armeg UK
13 hours ago, kerching said:

All holesaws should be like this

 

I could not believe how good they were

 

12 hours ago, Barx said:

 

I concur, Love 'em

Thanks guys for the positive comments on Acceler8%. It genuinely is one of our most popular products at the moment and is outselling our standard holesaws.

Other manufacturers have looked at what we're doing in the market with this product and decided they want a piece too. Consequently there are quite a few copies out there (one manufacturer even made them the same colour in the same style packaging!). The quality of some of the copies is dubious to say the least (I know, I've tested them!). It's the high cobalt content in the HSS teeth that make them last.

I also take a great deal of personal satisfaction from their success because I pushed quite hard to get them to market :)

Phil.

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binky

hurray, an ejector spring (only just looked at the link :innocent) the amount of time I've spent trying to eject stuck bit of mdf or plasterboard with a screwdiver.....

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roys

Acceler8 I want a shot at one of them, looks good,  I only use Starrett but I would certainly give one of them a try to see how it compares.  

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Sharpend

Have you tried the Bosch progressor range, effectively a quick release system that allows you to remove the saw from the arbour without any unscrewing, this then generally allows the pieces you've cut to drop out. 

Although having used the armeg accelerate it is quite useful ;) 

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kerching

Spring.....I would point out that quite often the spring does NOT push the slug out

 

i only use them on plastic and steel

 

wood and plasterboard get done with old starrets 

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Armeg UK
12 hours ago, binky said:

hurray, an ejector spring (only just looked at the link :innocent) the amount of time I've spent trying to eject stuck bit of mdf or plasterboard with a screwdiver.....

 

8 hours ago, kerching said:

Spring.....I would point out that quite often the spring does NOT push the slug out

 

i only use them on plastic and steel

 

wood and plasterboard get done with old starrets 

Feel I should point out that the Acceler8% is actually a sheet steel holesaw. It's maximum capacity thickness material is set at 1.6mm. The reason behind this is that the clearance is only on the gaps between the teeth. Cutting tools need clearance to function, giving somewhere for the waste material (swarf, fines, debris, chippings etc.) to go. If you drill through material that is too thick you overload the gaps between the teeth and the waste material has nowhere to go. This will stop progress and the natural reaction at this point is to push harder. Heat then builds up which will acceler8 (see what I did there :D ) the wear.

Mdf, plasterboard, plywood etc are all thicker than 1.6mm generally and therefore beyond the capabilities of the Acceler8%

Many people do use them on plastic trunking etc. but we find that although it will not wear them out as quickly as steel, the discs of waste material sometimes fail to eject due to the expansive/contractive nature of plastic.

Phil.

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kerching

If only we read instructions!

as Electricians we don't need to read instructions as we know everything...in fact there are a few on here who think they know MORE than everything :innocent

 

 

 

and your 'floor access cutter ' is very good as well. It doesn't get used very often as that is not my line of work. BUT when it does it extracts me from the faeces every time

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Armeg UK
Just now, kerching said:

If only we read instructions!

as Electricians we don't need to read instructions as we know everything...in fact there are a few on here who think they know MORE than everything :innocent

 

 

 

and your 'floor access cutter ' is very good as well. It doesn't get used very often as that is not my line of work. BUT when it does it extracts me from the faeces every time

I spend so much of my time painstakingly creating instructions for packaging, leaflets, website, catalogues etc. knowing full well that a lot of people don't read them :D 

Regarding electricians knowing everything, I hear that a lot! However, I do spend a lot of my time in conversation with them about engineering matters. A lot of them have no knowledge/training about materials/speeds/feeds/lubrication etc. which is important when a lot of the time they are dealing with metal. I like to think that after these conversations they get a lot more life out of their cutting tools.

Thanks for the positive comments on the SBC as well. All feedback is good, especially the good feedback ;) 

Phil.

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binky

most trades think drilling at high speed in the answer to everything, then wonder why the cutter has burn't out.... :^O.

 

 

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kerching

I had the very same conversation with my plumber today.

he wanted to know best way to drill a 40mm hole in a cast iron pipe. I had to explain speed, feed rates, lube ( or lack of for cast....but a bit won't harm)

and like punching a Politician....slower is better!

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Armeg UK
15 hours ago, binky said:

most trades think drilling at high speed in the answer to everything, then wonder why the cutter has burn't out.... :^O.

 

 

 

14 hours ago, kerching said:

I had the very same conversation with my plumber today.

he wanted to know best way to drill a 40mm hole in a cast iron pipe. I had to explain speed, feed rates, lube ( or lack of for cast....but a bit won't harm)

and like punching a Politician....slower is better!

I have many conversations with customers about using hole saws in metal seeing as the poor hole saw is the most abused power tool accessory there is.

The recommended speed for drilling into mild steel with our 20mm CVP hole saw is 425 RPM. Most of the people I speak to run them at the higher speed range on a combi drill which tends to be 1800 RPM. So they are running them at 4x the speed they should be. Most of them also do not use any sort of cutting oil/compound/paste etc. (mainly because they don't want to clear it up afterwards).

What kills most cutting tools (regardless of what material you are drilling) is heat. By running an accessory at the recommended speed using the recommended cutting coolant you are minimising heat build up and therefore maximising the life of the accessory.

Perfect example - I tested our CVP hole saw in stainless steel (whole different subject :) ) and using at the correct speed with the correct coolant I managed to get 100 holes. Using at high speed with no coolant, I didn't even manage 2 holes.

Phil.

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Rob.

Aside from a lot of people being misinformed on speeds they should be drilling there are a couple of factors to bare in mind:

 

  • Most battery or even corded drill wont have a setting to run slow enough (Without feathering the trigger). I'm no expert in metallurgy but could an alloy be designed to run at normal battery drill speeds? I realise this is probably impossible due to hardening effects of material being drilled, stainless is a great example.  (I also guess if it was designed, sales would drop as the bits would last a whole lot longer)
  • Another factor is if the cost of the drill bit is less expensive then the extra time taken to drill x amount of holes at a slower speed. I know at my hourly rate the client would rather me charge for a couple of ruined bits at £20 than 30min of my time spent properly drilling. 

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Tony S

A carborundem (silicon carbide SiC) edged blade would cut through most steels at a moderate cutting speed.

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Armeg UK
2 hours ago, Rob. said:

Aside from a lot of people being misinformed on speeds they should be drilling there are a couple of factors to bare in mind:

 

  • Most battery or even corded drill wont have a setting to run slow enough (Without feathering the trigger). I'm no expert in metallurgy but could an alloy be designed to run at normal battery drill speeds? I realise this is probably impossible due to hardening effects of material being drilled, stainless is a great example.  (I also guess if it was designed, sales would drop as the bits would last a whole lot longer)

Rob, you're right about most readily available battery drills having incorrect speeds to run metal drills properly. Alternatives involve investment unfortunately which some people will see far outweighs replacing drill bits.

There are some battery drills out there with speed ranges that are more geared towards engineering tasks. Also I know of one power tool company that have tools that have Bluetooth connectivity meaning that the rotational speed can be set more accurately using an app :innocent

 

Regarding designing hole saws that are capable of running at faster speeds, it might be worth looking at these

http://www.armeg.com/LDX-Metal-Carbide-Tipped-Holesaws

These are carbide tipped holesaws for massively longer life over conventional holesaws. The recommended speed for a 20mm in mild steel is about 700 RPM so you're not going to kill it on first speed range of a battery drill. In independent tests in 2mm thick stainless steel they were producing 350 holes so life is good too.

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Rob.
53 minutes ago, Armeg UK said:

Rob, you're right about most readily available battery drills having incorrect speeds to run metal drills properly. Alternatives involve investment unfortunately which some people will see far outweighs replacing drill bits.

There are some battery drills out there with speed ranges that are more geared towards engineering tasks. Also I know of one power tool company that have tools that have Bluetooth connectivity meaning that the rotational speed can be set more accurately using an app :innocent

 

Regarding designing hole saws that are capable of running at faster speeds, it might be worth looking at these

http://www.armeg.com/LDX-Metal-Carbide-Tipped-Holesaws

These are carbide tipped holesaws for massively longer life over conventional holesaws. The recommended speed for a 20mm in mild steel is about 700 RPM so you're not going to kill it on first speed range of a battery drill. In independent tests in 2mm thick stainless steel they were producing 350 holes so life is good too.

 

Christ, don't let the tool tarts hear about that! You'll be the cause of divorces!

 

An i'll certainly bare that in mind, although our workshop lads have a nice shiny hydraulic punch to go through the panels with now. So the hole saws have been set to one side for site work only. 

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