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Voltimum - NEWS ARTICLES UPDATE etc. (7 DECEMBER)

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Whilst the current-carrying capacity of a cable is dependent on a number of factors, this article looks at the impact of thermally insulating materials on the current carrying capacity of flat twin and earth cables installed in domestic premises.

A cable that is run in a space where thermal insulation is likely to be applied, such as in the loft of a dwelling, should preferably be installed so that contact with the thermal insulation is avoided. Otherwise, the operating temperature of the conductors may be exceeded (70˚C for thermoplastic (pvc) insulated conductors), possibly leading to a reduction in the service life of the cable or damage to the insulation of the conductors or adjacent material (Regulation 523.9 of BS 7671 refers).

However, it is common practice for thermally insulating materials to be installed in the walls and ceilings of domestic and similar premises to satisfy the energy efficiency and noise requirements of Building Regulations. Consequently, as shown in Fig 1, contact with thermal insulation is generally unavoidable for most twin and earth cables installed in domestic and similar premises.

So that cables installed in such locations will remain sufficient to meet the requirements of BS 7671, the cross-sectional area of conductors may need to be increased to compensate for any reduction in the current-carrying capacity due to thermal insulation.

Two different cases that need to be considered are:

  • cables surrounded by thermal insulation, and
  • cables routed in a thermally insulating wall or above a thermally insulating ceiling, the cable(s) being in contact with a thermally conductive surface on one side.

For a single cable likely to be totally surrounded by thermally insulating material for a length of 0.5 m or more, the current-carrying capacity must be taken as 0.5 times the current-carrying capacity for that cable clipped direct to a surface (Reference Method C).

Where a cable is to be totally surrounded by thermal insulation for less than 0.5 m, the current-carrying capacity of the cable must be reduced appropriately, depending on the size of cable, length in the insulation and thermal properties of the insulation. The rating factors (Ci) shown in Table 52.2 of BS 7671 should be applied, as appropriate, for conductor sizes up to 10 mm<sup>2</sup> in thermal insulation having a thermal conductivity (λ) greater than 0.04 Wm<sub>-1</sub> K<sub>-1</sub>.

For cables installed in a thermally insulating wall or above a thermally insulating ceiling - the cable being in

contact with a thermally conductive surface on one side - it is not necessary to apply a rating factor for thermal insulation from Table 52.2.

For such purposes, tabulated current carrying capacities are given in Appendix 4 of BS 7671 based on the Installation Method used. The electrical installation designer must decide which of the methods listed in Table 4A2 of Appendix 4 is the most appropriate. Installation Methods 100 – 103 (typicallynassociated with new domestic and similar premises) are specifically for flat twin and earth cable in thermal insulation. Where cables are installed using these Installation Methods, the current-carrying capacity of the cables should be determined using Table 4D5 of Appendix 4 (70ºC thermoplastic insulated and sheathed cable with protective conductor).

niceic-dec_fig2.jpg

In Fig 2, the current-carrying capacity of a 2.5 mm<sup>2</sup> flat twin and earth cable is shown in brackets for each of these Installation Methods. The values shown illustrate the impact of these Installation Methods on the current-carrying capacity of the cable. Particularly, considering a 2.5 mm<sup>2</sup> conductor clipped direct (Reference Method C) has current-carrying capacity of 27 A (Table 4D5 of Appendix 4 refers).site_guide2.png

It should be noted that where more than one Installation Method is applied for a circuit route, the method which provides the lowest current-carrying capacity (worst case scenario) should be used to determine the cable size.

For Installation Methods 100 – 103, Table 4A2 does not attribute a letter to indicate the Reference Method. Therefore, when compiling the electrical certificate, the Installation Method number should be recorded in the box entitled ‘Reference Method’ in the Schedule of Circuit Details (SOCD) for the particular circuit.

For more information on installation practices refer to the Site Guide for Electrical Installations publication.

For other guidance and publications please see the NICEIC website. For information about the NICEIC Approved Contractor or Domestic Installers schemes, visit www.niceic.com

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This article considers the impact of thermal insulation on the current carrying-capacity of flat twin and earth cables.
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Date of publication: 
05/12/2017
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The Ten Minute Rule Bill will seek to amend the 1996 Construction Act and ensure that retentions within construction are held in a third party trust scheme. A key aim will be to help protect companies in the construction supply chain from insolvency and payment uncertainly. The first reading of the Bill in Parliament will be on January 9th.

Both bodies jointly endorse the Bill, and will fully support it through its progress in Parliament. In addition, ECA and the BESA anticipate significant additional political and industry support for the Bill.  

Recent research by Pye Tait on retentions has shown that over £700m worth of retention money has been lost due to upstream insolvency in the past three years and that on average £27,500 is held in retention per contractor. In an industry of 280,000 SMEs, 44 per cent of contractors have suffered non-payment through upstream insolvency in the last three years.

Paul Reeve, Director of Business & External Affairs at the ECA:
“This Bill aims to protect the supply chain from the serious impact of lost retentions due to upstream insolvency.  Way beyond those companies who are damaged by upstream insolvency, even the possibility of losing retention money in this way hampers small business investment and growth.  As such, this Bill is entirely consistent with the aims of the new Industrial Strategy, which looks for innovation, and investment in skills”.

Rob Driscoll, Legal & Commercial Director at the BESA:
“With central government and major projects the biggest single construction client, the case for reform is inherently connected to the Government’s industrial strategy. To meet the challenges set by the recently launched Industrial Strategy and construction sector deal, enabling industry to re-invest in jobs, training, innovation and technological transformation, Government intervention is necessary to secure working capital that underpins the delivery models for the industry as a whole.”

The Bill will be introduced while the government consults over reforming the current retentions model. The government consultation runs until 19 January 2018. 
Peter Aldous has been MP for Waveney since 2010.  He has previously been a member of the Environmental Audit Committee, and is a longstanding champion of SMEs in industry.

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A forthcoming parliamentary Bill on retentions, to be introduced by Peter Aldous MP, will be backed by the Building Engineering Services Association (BESA) and the electrotechnical and engineering services body ECA.
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Before carrying out any new or additional installation works a contractor must determine that the supply to the installation is sufficient to meet the demands of the additional load. It must also be verified that the existing earthing and bonding arrangements are adequate (Regulation 132.16 refers).

Furthermore, the contractor responsible for carrying out the new installation work should be registered with a competent person scheme such as ELECSA<sup>1</sup>, and will be required under Part P of the Building Regulations to notify the local building control.

 

Protection against electric shock

Typically, the protective measure for shock protection will be Automatic Disconnection of Supply (ADS) (Regulation 411.3.2 Group and Table 41.1 refers).

To achieve the required disconnection time, the protective devices for the installed circuits must meet the requirements for the maximum earth fault loop impedance (Zs) values (Section 411 of BS 7671). The supply to the garage, being a distribution circuit, will require a fault to earth to clear within 5 s (Regulation 411.3.2.3 refers).

The final circuits within the garage will generally be rated at values not exceeding 32 A, therefore, the disconnection time must not exceed 0.4 s (Regulation 411.3.2.2 refers). Furthermore, the circuit supplying socket-outlets in the garage will require additional means of protection from an RCD having the characteristics complying with Regulation 415.1.1 (that is I<sub>Δn</sub>≤30mA).

 

Supply from the dwelling

The conventional method for a new supply to a garage would be to utilise an existing spare way in the consumer unit. A typical garage would generally require a maximum supply of 20 A while making allowance for diversity (Regulation 311.1).

Typically, the use of circuit-breakers to BS EN 60898 or RCBOs to BS EN 61009 would provide the distribution circuit with protection against both overload and fault-current (Regulation 433.1.1 and 434.5.2 refers); this does not preclude the use of a fuse to provide overcurrent protection. The current rating (In) for such device(s) must be less than or equal to the current-carrying-capacity (Iz) of the cable. Likewise, the need for additional protection by an RCD for the cable may not be required when provided with a screened metallic covering, providing it is adequately installed. These measures do not preclude other installation methods, protective devices or the use of RCD(s)/ RCBO(s) providing additional protection.

 

Supply Cable

Consideration needs to be given to the environmental conditions that may exist before deciding on a suitable wiring system. The protective measures undertaken for such conditions, including amongst other things, heat, sunlight, flora and fauna may affect the current-carrying-capacity (Iz) and ultimately the size of the cable (Regulation Group 523).

Except where the cable is installed within a conduit or a duct, it must incorporate an earthed armour or metallic sheath, or both, suitable for the use as a protective conductor. Where steel wire armoured (SWA) cable buried in the ground(Fig 1) is the system choice, it must be installed in such a way as to reduce the risk of damage from any foreseeable activity such as digging (Regulation 522.8.10 refers).

 

Exportation of TN-C-S to the garage

The contractor must consider the potential risks from a break in the supplier’s PEN conductor where the supply is a TN-C-S system. He/she must be fully satisfied, should the garage contain any extraneous-conductive-parts, that the protective bonding conductor is sized in accordance with the incoming neutral of the supply (Regulation 544.1.1 refers). In a domestic dwelling, typically this would mean that the minimum size of bonding conductor would be 10 mm<sup>2</sup>.

elecsafig2.jpg

Due to the practicalities for satisfying these requirements, the contractor may decide to convert the earthing arrangement within the garage to a TT system, incorporating an earth electrode (Regulation 542.1.2.3) preferably combined with an RCD (Regulation 411.5.2). If the decision is made to convert the garage into a TT system, care must be taken to ensure that no extraneous-conductive-parts forming part of the main dwelling enters the garage, such as a water pipe as shown in Fig 2.

Where such an arrangement is carried out, the supply cable would still need to be earthed at the dwelling end, but isolated from the TT earthing system within the garage.

The size of the garage earthing conductor to the electrode will need to be determined (Regulation 542.3.1 Table 54.1 refers), and that the connection to the electrode is electrically and mechanically sound (Regulation 542.3.2 refers).

 

Final Circuits

The contractor needs to be mindful of any expected external influence constituting a hazard to the garage electrical installation, and will need to select appropriate equipment (Regulation Group 512.2). Typically, a garage has no thermal insulation and there is the possibility that varying temperatures will result in a build-up of condensation and water collecting within accessories and luminaires (Regulation 522.3.1 refers).

  1. Part of the benefit of being registered with ELECSA is that they will notify the local building control on the contractor’s behalf after the contractor has registered the work.

For other guidance and publications please see the ELECSA website. Information about the ELECSA Domestic Installers schemes, visit www.elecsa.co.uk

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An overview of the correct procedures associated with installing an electrical supply to an outbuilding.
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Presented in front of 800 senior lighting professionals at a gala event at the O2 InterContinental, Philips Lighting’s YellowDot Technology won Connected Lighting Innovation of the Year Award. As the only open program that exists for lighting-based indoor positioning, judges commended Philips Lighting’s YellowDot Technology for ‘bringing the power of GPS to indoor retail applications’.

Philips Lighting’s Xitanium SR Driver also came highly commended in the Enabling Technology of the Year category, which highlights exceptional development in sources, drivers, optics, thermal products and innovative materials. Philips Xitanium SR LED drivers simplify the integration of sensors and controllers into luminaires because they do much more than provide power conversion for LED lighting.

For more information on the awards, please visit: http://luxreview.com/article/2017/11/-lux-awards-2017-winners-revealed 
 

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Philips Lighting (Euronext: LIGHT), the world leader in lighting, have announced one win and one highly commended at the Lux Awards 2017 for their OEM business - Philips Lighting OEM UK. The Lux Awards are a recognized annual event designed to celebrate both creativity and sustainability in lighting.
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SY, YY and CY cables are flexible cables which are being widely used in industrial installations in the UK and they are also being used increasingly in domestic installations. This is due, in part, to their being more robust than standard flexible cables. In addition, no special tools are required, which is an obvious advantage. 

However, they are non-standard cables and the question must be asked -  Are these types of cable acceptable for use in electrical installations in the UK?

This article will deal with this question.

 

SY, YY and CY cables                                                                                         

An obvious disadvantage of these cables is that cable data, such as the current-carrying capacity of conductors, is not readily available and reference must be made direct to the cable manufacturer. These cables are described in some manufacturers' literature as 'control' cables. The letters indicate:                                                                                                 

S - steel wire braid                                                                                                             

Y - PVC                                                                                                                    

C - copper braid

These letters do not indicate adherence to a particular standard. In the case of SY cables for example, they indicate only that these cables have a steel wire braid with a thermoplastic (PVC) oversheath. 

SY, YY and CY cables are claimed by some cable manufacturers to comply with the German standard, 'VDE 0250'.

cable_crossection.jpg

'VDE 0250'                                                                                                     

The VDE Institute is a national and internationally accredited institution in the field of testing and certification of electrotechnical devices, components and systems. (VDE stands for Verband der Elektrotechnik, Elektronik und Informationstechnik)

VDE publish a series of standards covering, among other things, various cable types. However, simply quoting the term, 'VDE 0250' is meaningless because it is not a specification and the ‘0250’ is just one part of a complete standard number. In order to be meaningful, the full standard number must be quoted. For example, the German NYM type of cable is defined in VDE 0250-204:2000.

The full VDE standard to which these cables might conform is unclear.

VDE standards are German national standards. They are neither Harmonised European (EN) nor International (IEC) standards. Therefore their use under BS 7671 is not automatic and they would be subject to the required engineering assessment regarding safety, etc.

NAPIT understands that the VDE Institute has issued certification to a small number of cable manufacturers for some SY, CY, and YY cables and that this certification is based on individual cable manufacturer specifications which are confidential to both VDE and the manufacturer. As these specifications have not been published, we are unable to determine which material and construction specifications or tests have been applied. Consequently, authoritive literature is not available to assist in making engineering judgements.

 

BS EN 50525-2-11                                                                             

The UK standard for PVC insulated and sheathed flexible cables is BS EN 50525-2-11 and some manufacturers of SY, CY and YY cables claim conformity with this standard. 

However, they have different constructions. There is no provision in BS EN 50525-2-11 for any braid and hence a braided cable, such as SY cable, cannot conform to this standard.

BS EN 50525-2-11 specifies various types of PVC flexible cable, such as H05VV-F.

The Approved Cables Initiative (ACI) reported last year that cables designated SY, YY or CY often have lower insulation and sheath thicknesses by comparison with the BS EN flexible cables.

 

The use of foreign standards                                                                      

Regulation 133.1.1 requires that every item of equipment (including cable) must comply with the appropriate British or Harmonized Standard. In the absence of such a standard, reference can be made to the appropriate IEC standard or the appropriate standard of another country.

As the VDE 2050 standard is neither a Harmonised European (EN) standard nor an IEC standard, it is doubtful whether it could be called, 'appropriate'.

If Regulation 133.1.1 is not complied with, Regulation 133.1.3 requires that the designer or the person responsible for specifying the cable must confirm that it provides at least the same degree of safety as that afforded by compliance with the Regulations.

A similar requirement for the designer or specifier to confirm the safety of non-standard equipment is given in Regulation Group 511.

This leads to the question - can a designer or a specifier, who has specified the use of SY, CY or YY cables, give such an assurance?  And on what basis would it be given?

 

Flexible cables in fixed installation

The fact that SY, CY and YY cables are flexible cables brings up a general point on the use of flexible cables in fixed installations.

An obvious use for flexible cables in fixed installations is for the final connection to equipment which may need to be adjusted, such as floodlights or motors. Flexible cables may also be used for overhead wiring between buildings. 

Regulation 521.9.1 permits the use of flexible cables for fixed wiring if they are of the heavy duty type or the risk of damage is low or protection against mechanical protection is provided. 

However, NAPIT does not advise the use of flexible cables in fixed electrical installations generally. 

Several of the manufacturers data sheets state that SY cables are not suitable for fixed wiring applications requiring compliance with the regulations as set out in BS 7671.

 

Conclusion                                                                                         

There is no doubt that SY, CY and YY cables have their supporters within the industry but the fact remains that they are non-standard cables and the general industry guidance is to discourage their use.

In order to be certain that cables comply with BS 7671, only those cables which are recognised in BS 7671 should be selected. 

Cable manufacturers sometimes claim that their cables 'generally' comply with a British or Harmonized Standard. All such claims should be treated with scepticism unless they can be verified.

When buying cables, it is important to ensure that they have the manufacturer's name and the standard or reference number for that cable clearly indicated on the sheath.

It is advisable to look for a third party mark of approval such as BASEC or LPCB.   

 

As a NAPIT Registered Installer, you can access a wealth of technical information, guidance and advice.

If you would like more information on joining a NAPIT scheme, visit www.napit.org.uk or call 0345 543 0330.

 

Brand: 
Thumbnail image: 
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Teaser: 
SY, YY and CY cables are non-standard cables. NAPIT's Bill Allan considers whether these types of cable are suitable for use in electrical installations in the UK.
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Which software do you use in your daily work for calculations / quotations? *
Word
Excel
Other Software
1
2
3

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Although BIM adoption across the industry remains slow, as it becomes gradually more commonplace, it's worth considering how its use might evolve in the future. The next step could be the introduction of virtual reality (VR), which will further enable the project team - and the client - to understand all the project's elements and allow for greater collaboration, innovation and problem-solving.

The introduction of VR could ultimately help the client see how a finished project will look, in a manner that's more realistic than a 3D computer model. Doing this at the planning stage of a project should mean any issues are spotted - and resolved - as early as possible, which in turn should make the delivery of the project more straightforward. 

Those who already work in this way have reported it leads to faster project approvals, better relationships with clients and higher levels of client satisfaction - not least because it helps them save time and money during a project's lifecycle.

In addition, the technology will allow service engineers to look at systems and see real-time data on any errors and maintenance schedules. VR could also source the system's instructions from the manufacturer or seek a second opinion, if this is required before work starts or if a course of action is recommended to the client.

Options for VR adoption

Firms already on the BIM ladder who are looking to follow suit should be aware there are a number of options available to them. One option is headsets or head mounted displays (HMDs). These allow the user a fully immersive 3D experience, and provide an opportunity to walk through an entire building - and access all the relevant information about every part of it - crucial when you think about the need to monitor costs and meet deadlines, and ensure objects are correctly positioned.

Another element of virtual reality technology that could be useful is real-time motion capture systems. These allow the user to move through a virtual environment as they would a real one, and eliminate the need to use a mouse and keyboard to explore rooms and buildings. Some systems have even gone as far as to develop full body suits with multiple sensors attached, making the experience as real as possible.

Mixed reality (MR), which blends the real world with virtual images and holograms, is also something which may become more common as part of the BIM process. This approach helps the user to gain greater insight into the construction of the building or a component within it. This may evolve in time to provide more details like product and planning information, which will be useful during the design stage - and indeed during the building lifecycle.

Challenges with VR and BIM

Having said all this, one key issue that may slow down BIM's adoption of virtual reality is the potential cost of the technology. Some of the more specialist elements mentioned above will cost thousands of pounds – which is a significant investment. However, the price of VR technology has declined significantly recently. If this trend continues, and the benefits become more widely known, we might see the technology become more accessible and affordable to companies throughout the construction supply chain.

Another fundamental challenge remains the construction industry’s slow progress in using BIM Level 2 on all projects. Despite being mandated on government projects last year, there is evidence that many clients are not requiring it, and indeed many contractors and specialist engineers not offering it during the tendering process. This, therefore, remains the current key objective for the industry in terms of the development of BIM.

A more viable and practical approach to VR for BIM newcomers is the use of apps on smartphones and tablets. There are a range of options that can enable anything from viewing a 2D drawing in 3D, to giving the user the ability to walk around rooms in a building and re-arrange elements of them. Some of these are even compatible with certain makes of headsets, giving the user a more in-depth experience than one provided by a mobile phone.

In addition, more training and support is also required at present to help get businesses up-to-speed with BIM. As part of this, the ECA and CIBSE created a ‘BIM checklist’ for contractors and clients to utilise when they start the climb the BIM ladder. While this is not as transformative as VR, the end goal – enhanced use of BIM to deliver productivity gains in the building and maintenance process – remains the same.

 

ECA members can obtain a free copy of the ECA/CIBSE BIM checklist. For more information, please click here

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Steve Martin, Director of Technical at leading electrotechnical and engineering services trade body the ECA, explores how virtual reality could interplay with Building Information Modelling (BIM).
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  • Keeping on the right side of new data rules

    New data protection regulations (GDPR) will be active next May. Here, Paul Reeve, ECA Director of Business & Steve Martin, ECA Director of Technical, run through how the rules will impact businesses in our industry.

  • Energy efficiency and the 18th Edition

    Steve Martin, ECA Head of Technical, takes a closer look at the proposed new section to appear in the 18th Edition to BS 7671.

  • Renewable energy back on the agenda

    Bill Wright, head of energy solutions at the ECA, is optimistic that the renewables sector remains a healthy market for contractors.

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05/12/2017
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Need security and protection? We hear you. Let us introduce Bright Head Mat. This security fixture comes in two styles, both weighing in at about 2.6kg which means this flood light is sturdy and can take a lot of punishment. With it’s sleek, black matt finish, it’s not short of admirers either. In terms of protection, both variations are IP65 rated which means this fixture has an excellent weather proof protection.

The main difference between the two variations is the lumens generated. The junior variation generates between 5,200 / 5,500 lumens at an efficiency of between 104 / 110 lumens per Watt. The senior variation generates between 8,000 / 8,400 lumens at an efficiency of between 100 / 105 lumens per Watt.

There is also a difference between the light emitted. There is a choice between two lenses, a symmetric and an asymmetric lens. The symmetric lens emits the well-known ‘light cone’ for the standard triangular shape on a flat surface. The asymmetrical version produces a rectangular shape on a flat surface.

This outdoor security flood light features a multi-chip head which helps reduce failure and has an estimated life of 50,000 hours.

If you’re looking to beef up outdoor security with an easy to install, no fuss product, then the Bright Head Mat is the flood light for you. So, if you’re looking to add a bit of muscle to your security then Bright Head Mat is for you.

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Get the job done right! add a bit of muscle to your security with our LED flood light – an easy to install multi-chip head with an expected estimated life of 50,000 hours.
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Commercial lighting needs two things. Enough power to light the place and enough life to ensure you’re not on constant call out for replacements. Ladies and gentlemen, may I introduce Gully Sully. This LED Bay luminaire can produce 12,500 lumens. That makes this luminaire super powerful with an expected life of 50,000 hours. At around 106 lumens per Watt, you won’t get any nasty surprises on your electricity bill either.

Not only does Gully Sully look like an awesome spaceship from a sci-fi movie, it also comes complete with a 5-year warranty. So, let’s recap: We have an easy to fit LED Bay luminaire – pushing out 12,500 of lumens – with a 5-year warranty. What is there to think about? Get the right product. Get to the job. Get it done right.

 

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Our super powerful easy to fit LED bay luminaire – pushing out 12,500 of lumens (106 lumens per Watt) with an expected life of 50,000 hours. The right product for commercial use.
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Harry Bartle started his apprenticeship with Chris Bowker ltd in July 2011. Since then he has won the ECA Edmundson’s Apprentice of the Year Award, JTL North of England Apprentice of the Year Award , been shortlisted for the ECA’s PowerPlayers initiative, travelled to Geneva to visit Schneider Electric, gained his testing and inspection qualifications in 2015 (as one of the youngest in the UK to do so) and is currently taking his HNC in Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Voltimum caught up with Harry recently to discuss his apprenticeship, his career ambitions and why he feels there are some great opportunities for young people in the electrotechnical industry.

 

Why did you decide to join the electrical trade?

I decided to start an electrical apprenticeship because I knew it was technically challenging. I had looked into it when I was at school and I saw the benefits of using the transferable, vocational skills that I had built up during resistant materials lessons and working alongside my dad, a self-employed joiner.  I also enjoyed maths and physics at school so I was confident I could handle the technical side.

Of all the trade apprenticeships available, I was certain that an electrical apprenticeship could help enhance the skills I already had and add a valuable string to my bow.

 

Did your school encourage you to take an apprenticeship?

Apprenticeships weren’t promoted enough at school.

I had to find my own route to it – mainly through my dad being in a trade. He knew the value that a trade can bring and it was mainly through working with him, and his friends who are electricians, in my spare time and on holidays that Igot the insight into the trade.

For people who aren’t exposed to those experiences, I can see how their choices could be limited.

 

What did you hope to gain from your apprenticeship? Was it different to your expectations going in?

I’ve always wanted to learn new skills and ask questions. I knew that over the course of my apprenticeship I could gain a National Vocational Qualification. But, I have also gained so much more from working with colleagues and building relationships which I think has enhanced my career and development opportunities in a way that isn’t relative to other apprentices

By getting out as much as possible and building relationships you can learn a lot more skills than you think. The technical side is important and is a side I take great pride and care in learning – especially fault finding. But I would definitely say that I’ve gained more than I initially expected from just working with a variety of people on site and asking questions.

 

Did you approach your apprenticeship with a career goal in mind?

I’ve always broken my career up into short-term goals and long-term goals. The short-term goals were, basically, the points you find on the application form for an apprenticeship which allows you to become a professional electrician. Completing those stages felt like a big achievement, especially after all of the time at college, exams and hours of extra work put in to get experience.

Along the way, as I was developing and saw the chance to take on project management and testing and inspection opportunities, I saw that there was more to the industry and I wanted to learn more about it.

This helped me focus on more long-term goals.  I wanted to become an established project manager, I wanted to study further and see where I could develop my qualifications. This has led me to look at getting my HNC in electrical and electronic engineering and then a degree.

 

Looking ahead, what would represent your “I’ve made it” moment?

I want to be a Chartered Engineer. I would like to be a fully established project manager by the age of 23. Then, I think it's achievable that I can be a chartered engineer by 28.

 

What do you enjoy the most about being in the electrotechnical environment?

I just enjoy going to work, especially the fundamental day to day tasks like fault finding and managing projects. I’ve been fortunate to work with some great people whilst I was training which has given me a broad perspective on how to approach and solve a variety of different situations and problems. I’ve also been part of a rugby team for the last ten years so I’m used to stepping up and being a leader. I want to be managing pricing scales and finding ways we can save or be more efficient on a project.

I also enjoy progressing. When I gained the inspection and testing qualification 2394 and 2395 in the 3rd year of my apprenticeship, that really made me think: “Not many people achieve this qualification at my age”.  This has made me feel like I can push on now so I’m asking, even more, questions and enjoying every aspect of my job.

 

Do you feel there can be a goldfish bowl mentality with some apprenticeships? Do you think there’s a limited view on the career potential a trade apprenticeship can provide?

I think this comes from apprenticeships not being sold properly, especially in schools.  There is more than just a trade at the end, the opportunities are a lot bigger. There isn’t enough information out there, especially for young people at school level, that shows the directions that a trade apprenticeship can lead you towards. It is just sold as a negative alternative which I find so frustrating. I look at the opportunities I have now I have finished my apprenticeship and the negative perception could not be further from the truth.

 

Do you feel the industry could do more to paint a more ambitious picture of electrotechnical apprenticeships?

I’d like to see apprenticeships divided up. Rather than just aiming in one direction - to become an electrician -  I think there could be more categories of electrotechnical apprenticeship available. Some can offer a more technical, design-based curriculum – maybe covering system integration, so there are clearer roots to different aspect of electrical engineering and you come away from it with a different set of skills.

Even if it’s a case of using your initiative finding the extra training yourself, it would be great if there was some kind of guidance towards short courses and other opportunities that can advise young electricians on how they can upskill and areas they could specialise in.

Having said that, it also depends on the apprentice.

My dad has always told me, ever since I started school, “You’ve got to be proactive, you’ve got to go and question things and work things out for yourself.”

To be successful you need that career drive, you need to think about what you can do with your qualifications otherwise you end up waiting for opportunities like everyone else.  You’ve got to try and be unique because that’s what makes you valued.  The more skills you gain, the more you show interest and initiative, then you become the part of the team that is missed the most.

 

What message do you have for those who are just starting their apprenticeship?

To anyone who has just started their first year, I would say, most importantly, enjoy your job. You could be studying for over four years; it’s going to be difficult and challenging but it is important to persist and take the opportunity to learn every day.

Also, never underestimate how important communication skills are. The ability to build relationships takes you further than the job role that you are in.

When you fresh out of school, and you haven’t developed those skills, forming relationships with colleagues and clients in your apprenticeship brings the confidence out in you. By asking questions and meeting new people, learn more from their perspective and interpretation of the job so you can develop your own approach. It can help make you more meticulous and methodical, which helps improve the quality of your work.

Even at first, when you are mucking in cleaning up after everyone or making the tea, thinking:” Is this what I signed up for?”.  You need to remember that this is all part of being successful and progressing.

You have to be patient and understand that as you build your experience, pass your exams and complete all the little jobs you will start to move forward, and it only ever speeds up if you get your head down and work hard.

From my experience, you could be making the brews one day and then handed something that is so out of your comfort zone and challenging the next. That’s why being proactive pays off.  Before you realise it, four and half years will have gone by and you will have accumulated a lot of knowledge. How you utilise and interpret the knowledge gained is the difference when planning the next steps in your career.

Do you agree with Harry? Want to share some advice for apprentices coming into the electrotechnical industry? Let us know in the comments below.

 

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When it comes to building a successful career, success and attitude go hand in hand. Following his decorated apprenticeship experience, Voltimum interviewed Harry Bartle, a young electrician whose ambition and work ethic suggest he has a bright future ahead of him in the electrotechnical industry.
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The awards, selected on the level of interest and enquiries generated by PE’s 70,000+ readership, are recognition for those manufacturers and suppliers that have made a real difference to the electrical contractor’s ability to get the job done efficiently, safely and professionally, whether this is in the form of innovative products, tools or time-saving solutions.

PE Editor, Richard Bowler said: “Our annual awards are a great way to reward those companies that have come up with excellent ideas to help electrical installers and businesses overcome common problems in their everyday work or open up new profit streams. The HD VanCam VR from ESP is therefore a very worthy winner of one of our 2017 Top Product awards.”
 

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The HD VanCam VR from ESP has been crowned a ‘Top Product’ award winner in Professional Electrician & Installer Magazine’s 2017 reader poll.
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Scolmore has made this task simpler than ever with the latest addition to its Click Smart wiring accessories range – the Click Smart 2-gang Outdoor Socket and Switch.  

The new product is part of Scolmore’s Aquip66 range of durable, easy-to-install weatherproof boxes which come as completely sealed units and are designed to offer a high level of protection against ingress of water jets and dust. It is available as a boxed smart solution, with each box containing one 2-gang Anthracite Grey IP66 Weatherproof socket, one white Smart switch and one white receiver.

By simply adding the receiver to the socket and the switch to a convenient location, it allows smart control of anything plugged into the socket, from anywhere in the home.

The IP66-rated weatherproof socket and switch enclosures offer users a single fix installation - with the whole of the back box fixing to the wall to accommodate the socket or modules.  Multiple knock-outs on each side (20mm) allow for entry from all angles, and a flexible rubber base with rear entry gasket provides extra weatherproof protection, as well as allowing for mounting on most types of uneven surfaces. 

The sockets and switches can be purchased as empty unfurnished boxes or furnished with the appropriate socket or switch modules.  A spring loaded lid makes for easy access and the units are also lockable which safeguards them against tampering, as well as allowing for safe isolation.

The range is supplied in anthracite grey, with its robust construction providing high-impact resistance and it is UV protected against fading.  The versatility of the range means the units can be used for a wide range of wiring accessories including Fused Connection Units and Isolation Switches.  

Further products from the Click Smart range can be seen at www.click-smart.com or contact Scolmore on 01827 63454: www.scolmore.com.
 

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There are many reasons for wanting to add a wireless switch to an outdoor socket, for example switching on a light, controlling an outdoor appliance or sprinklers, or the ability to switch off power for security.
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Made from high quality brushed stainless steel, In-desk is designed to complement the aesthetic of modern workspaces, giving users power when they need it and minimal, sleek design when they don’t.
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a:12:{i:0;s:74:"POWERED BY SPECIALISTSMORE POWER TOYOUR DESKTOP IN-DESK AND ON-DESK POWER";i:1;s:308:"ELECTRAK IN-DESK enhancing the workstationIN-DESK BRINGS STYLE AND FLEXIBILITY TO THE WORKSTATIONMade from high quality brushed stainless steel, In-desk is designed to complement the aesthetic of modern workspaces, giving users power when they need it and minimal, sleek design when they don’t.";i:2;s:498:"EASY INSTALLATIONThe Electrak In-desk range is pre-wired with a BS plug, GST or Intersoc-R connector for simple tool-free electrical connection.MINIMAL AND DISCREETWhen power isn’t required, the ultra-slim brushed stainless steel cover closes to fit discreetly into the desktop.1With the simple touch of a button, the unit elegantly rises from the desk in a smooth action to reveal either a traditional twin socket arrangement or a single socket with twin USB outlets for charging mobile devices.";i:3;s:1758:"108mm(1)131mm(1)120mm142.5mmD74.8mmXY70 mm20 mm15 mm < e < 40 mm12In-desk unitstechnical informationIn-desk units Technical characteristicsEarthing system: R < 0.05 OhmsResistance to vertical load applied through small surface area: 1500 N cover open, 3000 N cover closedRated voltage: U 500 V - R > 5 MOhmsElectric strength: 2000 VMaterial: Halogen free material, fire proofed and no propagator of the flameResistant to corrosion and to temperature changesFinish: Brushed Stainless steel, zamak nickel coatingSafety: You must earth the systemCleaning: The exterior should only be cleaned using a damp cloth (avoid contact with the active parts). Do not use abrasive detergentClassification of In-desk flush-mounting boxes according to NFC 61-314 / EN 60670-1 / EN 60670-23 Protection against mechanical impact: IK 07 Degree of ingress protection: IP 30 cover open, IP 40 cover closed Installation1: +/- 1 mm Dimensions Positioning of the fixing supportsPackCat. Nos.In-desk units111111POPA3012AAPOPB1012AAPOPD1012AA POPA3020AAPOPB1020AAPOPD1020AAUSB power supply for recharging portable devices:Conforms to IEC 62684-2011-01Consumption in passive mode < 0.1 WDouble USB sockets - 5 V - 2400 mAFor fast charging telephones, smartphones, MP3/MP4 players and tablet PC British standard socket outlet:Shuttered for child safetyASTA licencedConforms to BS 1363 Part 2Unit with single socket and twin USB outletsUnit with 3m lead and BS1363 plugUnit with 1.5m lead and GST connectorUnit with 1.5m lead and Intersoc-R connectorUnit with twin socketsUnit with 3m lead and BS1363 plugUnit with 1.5m lead and GST connectorUnit with 1.5m lead and Intersoc-R connectorMinimum distance from to the edges of the furniture:234All dimensions (mm) are nominal ";i:4;s:391:"Legrand’s Qi certified induction charger can be easily installed into desks, tables and other furniture – allowing Qi enabled smartphones and other mobile devices to be charged simply by placing them on top. Charging has never been more simple.Extra flat, supplied with a micro USB/USB cable and a USB mobile power supply (cat. no. 077580).POWER SET FREE wireless charging";i:5;s:337:"4ON-DESK BRINGS POWER, DATA AND RAPID USB CHARGING TO THE WORKSTATIONWith clean lines and a stylish aluminium and mirror white finish, On-desk’s ergonomic design blends in perfectly with contemporary office design schemes and enhances the functionality of the desk space.ELECTRAK ON-DESK power and data at your fingertips";i:6;s:1173:"5On-desk can be tailored to the demands of any workstation. Select any combination of power sockets and USB charging modules, and further enhance functionality with plug and play data solutions or Euro modules. Legrand’s modular wiring accessories, including a range of AV solutions, can also be incorporated. HIGH PERFORMANCE DATAOn-desk offers plug and play CAT 5e and CAT 6 data options or CAT 6A keystone jack modules for higher performance. Euro module carriers are also available to accommodate specific data requirements. The innovative design enables data cables to neatly exit through the rear of the unit, avoiding the need to bend the cables which can impair the data performance.RAPID USB CHARGINGIntelligent twin USB modules offer a high specification, rapid charge facility that keeps your mobile devices ready should you ever need to work on the move. Up to two devices (e.g. tablet and smart phone) can be simultaneously charged at a faster rate than common, lower output chargers.Building on the success of the Electrak system, On-desk is powered by a busbar backbone which provides robust, reliable electrical distribution.Tailored to your requirements ";i:7;s:2497:"6Electrak On-desk modulesFixingsDescriptionCat. No.Desk clamp0546 99Pre-wired with 3 m flex and BS 1363 plugPre-wired with 1·5 m flex and GST connectorPre-wired with 1·5 m flex and Intersoc-R connectorDescriptionCat. No.Cat. No.Cat. No.PA3320AAPA3320AA172120PA3320AA2831201072 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 APA3320AAPB1320AAPD1320AAPA3330AAPA3330AAPA3330AA1802323 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 APA3330AAPB1330AAPD1330AAPA3340AAPA3340AAPA3340AA2402924 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 APA3340AAPB1340AAPD1340AAIsometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AB283()107()152.5Front viewScale: 1:2152·5204·5PA3320AB2 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 1 x rear pluggable CAT 5e / CAT 6 RJ45 outletPA3320ABPB1320ABPD1320ABPA3320ACPA3320AC2271752 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 2 x rear pluggable CAT 5e / CAT 6 RJ45 outletsPA3320ACPB1320ACPD1320ACIsometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320ADPA3320AD152·5204·52 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 1 x rear pluggable data USB outletPA3320ADPB1320ADPD1320ADIsometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AEPA3320AE1752272 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 2 x rear pluggable data USB outletsPA3320AEPB1320AEPD1320AEIsometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AFPA3320AF1752272 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 1 x CAT 6A RJ45 outlet with 3 m data leadPA3320AFPB1320AFPD1320AFIsometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AGPA3320AG2302822 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 2 x CAT 6A RJ45 outlets with 3 m data leadsPA3320AGPB1320AGPD1320AGIsometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AKPA3320AK1602122 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus carrier to accept 1 x Euro Module (25 x 50 mm)PA3320AKPB1320AKPD1320AKIsometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320ALPA3320AL2371852 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus carrier to accept 2 x Euro Modules (50 x 50 mm)PA3320ALPB1320ALPD1320ALPA3330ABPA3330AB3 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 1 x rear pluggable CAT 5e / CAT 6 RJ45 outletPA3330ABPB1330ABPD1330ABPA3330ABPA3330AB3 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 2 x rear pluggable CAT 5e / CAT 6 RJ45 outletsPA3330ACPB1330ACPD1330AC3 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 1 x rear pluggable data USB outletPA3330ADPB1330ADPD1330ADPA3330AEPA3330AE3 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus 2 x rear pluggable data USB outletsPA3330AEPB1330AEPD1330AE";i:8;s:3226:"7Notes: Other options are available to special order. Contact us on +44 (0) 345 605 4333CAT 5e / CAT 6 outlets have a rear facing RJ45 that will accept either CAT 5e or CAT 6 data cabling (no data cabling is included with the product)CAT 6A outlets are supplied with 3 m pre-wired lead and performance certificateThe data USB outlets have a short flying lead at the rear for USB connection to the PC (no additional data cabling is included with the product)Units supplied with carriers to accept Euro Modules will be supplied with apertures at the rear for the passing of data or AV cablesElectrak On-desk moduleswith twin outlet USB chargerPre-wired with 3 m flex and BS 1363 plugPre-wired with 1·5 m flex and GST connectorPre-wired with 1·5 m flex and Intersoc-R connectorDescriptionCat. No.Cat. No.Cat. No.PA3012AAPA3012AA1152831131 x unfused socket plus twin outlet USB chargerPA3012AAPB1012AAPD1012AAPA3322AAPA3322AA1752272 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus twin outlet USB chargerPA3322AAPB1322AAPD1322AAPA3332AAPA3332AA3 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A plus twin outlet USB chargerPA3332AAPB1332AAPD1332AA1 x unfused socket, twin outlet USB charger plus 1 x rear pluggable CAT 5e / CAT 6 RJ45 outletPA3012ABPB1012ABPD1012ABPA3012ACPA3012AC1 x unfused socket, twin outlet USB charger plus 2 x rear pluggable CAT 5e / CAT 6 RJ45 outletsPA3012ACPB1012ACPD1012ACPA3012ADPA3012AD1 x unfused socket, twin outlet USB charger plus 1 x rear pluggable data USB outletPA3012ADPB1012ADPD1012ADPA3012AEPA3012AE1 x unfused socket, twin outlet USB charger plus 2 x rear pluggable data USB outletsPA3012AEPB1012AEPD1012AEIsometric viewScale : 1:2107()207.5283Front viewScale: 1:2PA3322ABPA3322AB2 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A, twin outlet USB charger plus 1 x rear pluggable CAT 5e / CAT 6 RJ45 outletPA3322ABPB1322ABPD1322ABIsometric viewScale : 1:278()230282Front viewScale: 1:2PA3322ACPA3322AC2 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A, twin outlet USB charger plus 2 x rear pluggable CAT 5e / CAT 6 RJ45 outletsPA3322ACPB1322ACPD1322ACIsometric viewScale : 1:278()207.5283Front viewScale: 1:2PA3322ADPA3322AD2 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A, twin outlet USB charger plus 1 x rear pluggable data USB outletPA3322ADPB1322ADPD1322ADIsometric viewScale : 1:278()230282Front viewScale: 1:2PA3322AEPA3322AE2 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A, twin outlet USB charger plus 2 x rear pluggable data USB outletsPA3322AEPB1322AEPD1322AEIsometric viewScale : 1:2230391Front viewScale: 1:2PA3322AFPA3322AF2 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A, twin outlet USB charger plus 1 x CAT 6A RJ45 outlet with 3 m data leadPA3322AFPB1322AFPD1322AFPA3322AGPA3322AG2 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A, twin outlet USB charger plus 2 x CAT 6A RJ45 outlets with 3 m data leadsPA3322AGPB1322AGPD1322AGIsometric viewScale : 1:2267()107()215Front viewScale: 1:2PA3322AKPA3322AK2 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A, twin outlet USB charger plus carrier to accept 1 x Euro Module (25 x 50 mm)PA3322AKPB1322AKPD1322AK2 x sockets individually fused at 3·15 A, twin outlet USB charger plus double carrier to accept 2 x Euro Modules (50 x 50 mm)PA3322ALPB1322ALPD1322AL";i:9;s:863:"PA3320AAPA3320AA172120PA3320AA283120107PA3330AAPA3330AAPA3330AA180232PA3322AAPA3322AA175227PA3340AAPA3340AAPA3340AA240292Isometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320ADPA3320AD152·5204·5Isometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AEPA3320AE175227Isometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AB283()107()152.5Front viewScale: 1:2152·5204·5PA3320ABPA3320ACPA3320AC227175Isometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AFPA3320AF175227Isometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AGPA3320AG2302827891CARTON LABEL POSITION DETAIL543590To suit desk thickness of 6–40 mmCARTON LABEL POSITION DETAIL543590To suit desk thickness of 6–40 mm8Electrak On-desk modulestechnical information On-desk dimensions (mm)All dimensions (mm) are nominalPA3320AAPA3330AAPA3322AAPA3340AAPA3320ADPA3320AEPA3320ABPA3320ACPA3320AFPA3320AG";i:10;s:1598:"Isometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320AKPA3320AK160212Isometric viewScale : 1:2Front viewScale: 1:2PA3320ALPA3320AL2371859 Testing and accreditation BS 6396 : 2008Electrical Systems in Office Furniture and Educational Furniture SpecificationBelow is a brief outline of the main criteria within the standards :BS 6396 : 2008 was published with regard to the use of electrical equipment within general office and educational furniture. This standard sets out in its scope the use and testing of electrical socket outlets and associated wiring when used together with a 13 A BS 1363 fused plug for mains supply and makes provision for the routing of cables through furnitureThe standard requires individual socket fusing (as per the table below)BS 6396 : 2008 requires RCD protection for electrical socketsTotal number of sockets2, 3 or 4 sockets 5 or 6 socketsIndividually fused at up to 5 A 3·15 AComplies with BS 5733 and relevant parts of BS 1363-2 Manufactured within an approved ISO 9001 : 2008 and ISO 14001 : 2004 facilityModule housing aluminium / PVCModule fascia polycarbonate / ABSSocket outlets polycarbonateEnd caps ABSMaterial specificationSupply voltage (nominal) 230 V (AC)Supply current 1·3 mAPower consumption (max.) 0·3 WFrequency 50 HzOutput voltage +5·0 V ± 0·25 (DC)Output current 3·1 AOutput power 15 W (max.)Over current protection 3·8 A (max.)Output connectors 2 x USB Type A socketsCurrent per socket 2·1 A (max.)USB charger module specificationPA3320AK On-desk dimensions (mm) (continued)All dimensions (mm) are nominalPA3320AL";i:11;s:1492:"Head office (UK and Ireland):Legrand Electric LimitedGreat King Street North, Birmingham, B19 2LFTel: +44 (0) 370 608 9000 Fax: +44 (0) 370 608 9004Website: www.legrand.co.ukSocial iconRounded squareOnly use blue and/or white.For more details check out ourBrand Guidelines.In accordance with its policy of continuous improvement, theCompany reserves the right to change specifications and designswithout notice. All illustrations, descriptions, dimensions and weightsin this catalogue are for guidance and cannot be held binding onthe Company. All contents and design presentation included in thispublication are © Legrand Electric Limited. All rights reserved. 2017CONTACT DETAILS Quotations and Technical Support: Legrand Electric Ltd. Great King Street North, Birmingham, B19 2LF Tel: +44 (0) 370 608 9020 Fax: +44 (0) 345 600 6760 E-mail: powersales.uk@legrand.co.ukCustomer Services: Legrand Electric Ltd. No. 1 Industrial Estate Medmonsley Road, Consett County Durham, DH8 6SR Tel: +44 (0) 345 605 4333 Fax: +44 (0) 345 600 6366 E-mail: powersales.uk@legrand.co.uk Republic of Ireland: Tel: 01 295 9673 Fax: 01 295 4671 E-mail: powersales.uk@legrand.co.ukThis document is printed on sustainably sourced paper. Please recycle.The Legrand logo is a registered trademarkof the Legrand group of companies.999523 Electrak In-desk and On-desk 2017.10.3kwww.legrand.co.ukwww.legrand.iewww.youtube.com/legrandtvukwww.twitter.com/legranduk www.voltimum.co.ukwww.voltimum.ieFOLLOW US AT";}
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In-desk by Legrand brings style and flexibility to the workstation. Enjoy power when you need it and sleek, minimal design when you don’t.
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a:11:{i:0;s:20:"IN-DESK POWERTHIS IS";i:1;s:0:"";i:2;s:161:"IN-DESKIn-desk by Legrand brings style and flexibility to the workstation. Enjoy power when you need it and sleek, minimal design when you don’t.INTRODUCING 01";i:3;s:281:"Stainless SteelIn the modern office, the desk is more than a simple place to work. It’s a multifunctional space of inspiration, collaboration and communication. At Legrand, we power that space with style.Sleek brushed steel finishRapid USB chargingMinimal designBUILT-IN STYLE03";i:4;s:227:"REVEAL HIDDEN POWERWith the simple touch of a button the unit rises from the desk in a smooth action. Choose between a traditional twin socket arrangement, or a single socket with twin USB outlets for charging mobile devices.04";i:5;s:384:"05MINIMAL . TO MAXIMISE DESK SPACEIn any office, desk space is at a premium. So when power isn’t required, the ultra-slim cover closes to fit discreetly into the desk.BE AUTIFULLY M A DE , INHERENTLY POWERFULWith an elegant design and brushed stainless steel finish, the In-desk range enhances the modern office environment and places power and charging right at your fingertips.";i:6;s:299:"06ON-DESKThe On-desk range from Legrand is a power and data solution that attaches to the workstation. With clean lines and a stylish aluminium and mirror white finish, the ergonomic design of On-desk blends in perfectly with the modern office and enhances the functionality of the desk.INTRODUCING ";i:7;s:438:"07SIMPLE TO INSTALLOn-desk is available with a choice of pre-wired electrical connectors for simple installation. Data and AV solutions are generally supplied with a plug and play facility at the rear of the unit for easy connection.TAILORED TO YOUR REQUIREMENTSOn-desk can be tailored to the demands of anyworkstation. The innovative design enables wide-ranging combinations of power sockets, USB charging modules, data and AV solutions.";i:8;s:278:"POWER SET FREELegrand’s Qi certified induction charger can be easily installed into desks, tables and other furniture, allowing Qi enabled smartphones and other mobile devices to be charged simply by placing them on top. Charging has never been more simple!WIRELESS CHARGING08";i:9;s:554:"ABOUT USGLOBAL INNOVATIONLegrand is the global specialist in electrical and digital building infrastructures. Innovation is the driving force behind its development. With an increasing investment in research and development, and more than 4,000 active patents, the Legrand Group is focused on maintaining a high rate of new product launches that present innovative solutions to the market. GLOBAL RESPONSIBILITYLegrand aims to offer sustainable solutions to users and act ethically towards society, all the while limiting its impact on the environment.09";i:10;s:184:"WWW.LEGRAND.CO.UKLegrand Electric Ltd. Great King Street North, Birmingham, B19 2LF t: +44 (0) 345 605 4333 e: powersales.uk@legrand.co.uk Legrand UK & Irelandlegrandtvuklegranduk ";}
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The awards, which reward excellence in the energy business, will be announced on Wednesday, 06.December at the London Hilton on Park Lane. The awards ceremony will be attended by some of the most senior local and international operators in the energy market and the event promises to be the perfect opportunity to network with the sector’s finest.

“We are thrilled to have been shortlisted twice at these important industry awards. At Vent-Axia, the energy efficiency of our products is a major driving force in continual innovation and improvement, and so to be recognised in these awards is a great honour”, said Ian Mitchell, Product Marketing Manager - New Build Residential, Vent-Axia. “Our pioneering Sentinel Kinetic Advance leads the way in energy efficient Mechanical Ventilation with Heat Recovery.”

The innovative Sentinel Kinetic Advance is a new breed of MVHR ventilation system with best in class performance and offering near silent, energy efficient and high-pressure operation. Perfect for new build residential properties as well as care homes and student accommodation, Advance boasts a specific fan power of 0.38W/l/w with 93% heat recovery and airflow of 100l/s at 150Pa.

Designed for air-tight thermally efficient new build properties, the Advance is the first UK-manufactured web-enabled App-controlled MVHR unit, providing energy efficient ventilation and pioneering control. Featuring ground breaking commissioning and control via the App, Advance encourages best practice and high performance through simplified commissioning, saving installers time on site. USB functionality also allows pre-commissioning, thus saving time on developments with same specification builds.

Offering a range of features that improve indoor air quality (IAQ), the Advance features a unique and innovative free App which residents can download onto their smartphones to allow them to control their IAQ. Via the App residents can boost the unit and view efficiencies and temperatures. Filters up to F7 grade ensure that even buildings in heavily urbanised areas can filter out most impurities, including damaging PM2.5 particles. A filter check warning tells building occupiers via the App or email when filters need changing, thus helping to maintain the quality of incoming air.

Advance also features a revolutionary programmable summer bypass to ensure year-round thermal comfort. The summer bypass is pioneering since it is fully automatic and truly intelligent, a first. The summer bypass is set for both comfort temperature and minimum external temperature. These settings enable the controls to determine whether it is winter or summer allowing it to run without resident intervention.

For further cooling the Advance summer bypass has an evening purge feature that boosts early evening and then runs on a timer until about 10pm so there is no nuisance noise at night. Additional cooling is also available for periods of several days of high temperatures and warm nights. Here the Advance utilises a Night-Time Purge. This allows a building to be pre-cooled for the following day by taking advantage of cooler night-time temperatures.

For further information on the Sentinel Kinetic Advance MVHR as well as other products and services offered by Vent-Axia, visit www.vent-axia.com/range/sentinel-kinetic-advance

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Vent-Axia is delighted to announce that it has been shortlisted in two categories in The Energy Awards 2017. The company’s revolutionary Mechanical Ventilation with Heat Recovery (MVHR) unit, the Sentinel Kinetic Advance, has been named as a finalist in the ‘Energy Efficient Product of the Year - HVAC&R’ and ‘Innovation of the Year -Technology: Physical’ categories.
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Lo-Carbon Sentinel Kinetic Advance
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Lo-Carbon Sentinel Kinetic Advance
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06/12/2017
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If you speak to any distribution network operator (DNO), they will tell you that customer service and satisfaction is their number one priority. If there is an outage or failure, they want to be seen to be responsive – giving timely updates and information on when the problem will be fixed. To do that, they are investing in new technologies to improve the design, operation, maintenance and improvement of distribution networks everywhere.

However, traditional electric distribution networks, like our own grid in the UK, weren’t built with today’s technologies in mind. The traditional DNO distribution model focused on one-way delivery of electricity, with clear and reliable definitions of upstream and downstream.

An evolved distribution model
With the evolution of the UK’s energy mix, moving to a more balanced blend of traditional energy sources with distributed generation – from the likes of renewable sources, energy storage and microgrids – the classic DNO model is changing. The upshot of this is a bottom up approach to the modern distribution network and a great deal of confusion. And this isn’t going away. The UK generated more electricity from renewables than traditional fuel sources for the first time at the start of the summer. If renewables are to continue to rise, this will be dependent on how network operators are able to balance the network.

The recent findings from the government-sponsored Future Power System Architecture programme makes for some interesting reading. What’s at stake is the power sector drifting off course instead of focusing on a smooth transition that works for all stakeholders. The fact is, DNOs don’t know where to position themselves as companies. In the future, they may be responsible for balancing the network, in the transition to a more complex, systemic model that accounts for and manages multiple points of variable supply and consumption – far removed from the traditional one-way street of electricity delivery. Employing these modern technologies and practices are what separate a DNO from being a Distribution System Operator (DSO).

The role of the DSO
In order for DSOs to satisfy customers – especially during times of peak demand – they must account for an enormous variety of production and load scenarios, as contingencies rise in step with the number of Distributed Energy Resource (DER) mechanisms added to the network. Accommodating the addition of new part-time energy sources further swells network management complexity.

Distribution generation, demand response, and energy storage mechanisms introduce new variables to any system. These new variables require a more flexible network, not only with respect to its operation, but also investments in new network infrastructure – as well as ways to manage and develop that infrastructure at the lowest cost.

The DSO also faces challenges that the DNO does not. DSOs must deal with flexible demand, and operate networks that can accommodate resources like demand response. They control networks capable of intelligently aggregating many different geographically dispersed inputs and the complications that come with that. For example, demand generation sources can’t always control their own production levels. Increased feed-in can also exceed local load, causing grid congestion, or have voltage variation and other power quality problems. What’s more, demand generation source locations are sometimes less than ideal. For example, they’re not close to the highest loads, where they might most efficiently alleviate peak demand.

DNOs don’t become DSOs overnight, but over time. A long time. And the rate at which that transformation occurs varies. It varies by continent, country, and region. One of the more likely models for the UK to adopt can be found in Australia. Although a geographically larger island, the energy grid there is built in clusters, as opposed to the continent of Europe for example, which runs on an interconnected system.

A permanent step forward
One of the more common concerns expressed by DNOs as they implement automation systems is quite simply the move away from manual controls. Once a system is running decisions led by highly intelligent, computerised tools, machine-based philosophies and models, this marks a clear break from the past. The networks of the future cannot be managed by human intervention alone. It is these systems that will accelerate the evolution of network operation.

While this transition is taking place, the reality is the next decade is unclear. It is going to depend on the stake the government and those running the system will take in modernising the grid.

Synchronization sites: 
www.voltimum.ie
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Barrie Cressey, business development director - smart grids at Schneider Electric analyses how we can prepare for the rapid growth in energy, digitisation and a world of renewable decentralised energy
Date of publication: 
07/12/2017
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Check out our rundown of some of the latest workwear designed to help you maintain peak performance on-site this winter.
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Scruffs Active Hoodie
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The Scruffs Active Hoodie is an ideal layering piece to keep you warm when working outside in the cold. Breathable and moisture wicking stretch fleece regulates your body temperature and ensures you stay comfortable throughout the day. Elasticated cuffs with thumb grips hold the sleeves in place, whilst a ribbed hem helps to keep out cold air. Secure YKK zipped pockets provide storage for your accessories. https://www.scruffs.com/active-hoodie.html
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