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ProDave

Anyone replaced the drum bearings on a washing machine?

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ProDave

 

I have a Daewoo direct drive washing machine model DWD-G1441S

 

The drum bearings are on their last legs.  Is replacement feasible or even possible?

 

I have taken the motor rotor off for a look. I can see the outer bearing and the drum shaft.

 

It looks like a bit of a major strip down to gain access to split the drum outer casing.  Then what?

 

First thing would be to push the shaft through and withdraw the drum How do I do that? just hit the shaft with a hammer?

 

Then if I manage that how do I get the bearings out? I assume there will be 2. How tight will they be? can I drive them out with a hammer and a bar?  I can't see as I can apply heat as the drum outer casing is plastic.

 

Any thoughts as to whether this is possible if somewhat difficult, or not?

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Andy™

id expect it to be possible, but you will probably end up taking a lot of it apart

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ProDave

It looks like the front panel of the machine can be remove and then the outer drum split leaving the rear half of the casing in the machine

 

It' then how to remove the drum and remove and re fit the bearings.

Edited by ProDave

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binky

bit of an epic job I would say. Chances are the bearing races are pressed into the drum housing, which will mean drifting the outer race out will be a barsteward. Got to be worth a try, but don't be too surpirsed if you end up with a new nachine.

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Sidewinder

I have done it, years ago, if you can fix cars, then to change the bearings is not an issue.

Remember if the housing is plastic, the fit will not be that tight to need heat.

I would not be surprised to find retainers though.

Make sure you  get the correct internal clearance bearings though & fit 2RS no matter what comes out.

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sprocketflup

Ive also done it, and I'm a  monkee. Wasn't to difficult at all for someone with a basic mechanical knowledge, but did mean stripping a fair bit of the machine down. Took plenty of pics on the way and Robert was my fathers cross dressing uncle.

 

Machine ran fine for almost a moth and then the PCB blew and the cost of replacing meant it went to the great laundrette in the sky. C'est la vie

 

How olds your machine? Sure its a job worth doing?

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ProDave

Machine is 11 years old. Still looks like new, and has never given any trouble in that time, the longest any WM we have owned before something went wrong.

 

So either that means it's a good un and worth fixing, or it's about to all start breaking....

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Blue Duck

 

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Onoff

The wife insists I did the bearings on our last one, Bendix I think if was. I only half remember. 

 

But then I've done so many dishwashers, fridges and cookers with various ailments I've lost count. This washing machine how has a service agreement and it'd the best thing I've done. Hotpoint WMD960 and it's had EVERYTHING done.....TWICE! Last time the bearings needed replacing my missus ended up taking the engineer and drum/shaft over to her brother as i was out and he needed a grinder! :) All my stuff is kept locked up. 

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revjames

I did one a few years ago. A bendix machine if I remember correctly. Took top off machine, took lots of photos, disconnected all the pipes, cables mounts etc and hauled the main drum assembly out using a beam and a chainblock, like taking an engine out. Then removed about 25 bolts to separate the 2 halves and gain access to the inner steel drum. Kit from ebay was about £15 and a days faffing. Lasted another year or so. Was it worth it? no. Bought a Hotpoint and that lasted another 10 years without issue. Just paid a bit more and bought a Bosch. My mother had one and it lasted more than 15 years with no issues.

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Sharpend

A hotpoint is a Bosch in disguise.

 

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revjames
2 minutes ago, Sharpend said:

A hotpoint is a Bosch in disguise.

 

no. Hotpoint and Candy are made in the same factory though. Used to be up the road in Llandudno Junction

 

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Sharpend

Hotpoint used to be made in a factory in Peterborough, I used to go there and buy the parts for hotpoint, candy, indesit.

 

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Onoff

My mother's Bosch washing machine has been going for 34 years and I think I did a brush change once. Had to buy the whole brush holder assembly mind! Proper drum suspension system on it too. Bulletproof

 

Our Bosch dishwasher just keeps on going too. A few new bits.

 

Have heard though that in recent years they bought a factory in Spain to make their cheaper end models. Whereas once they were all  "Made In Germany" beware the ones stamped "Made In EU" I've read.

 

 

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Richard-the-ninth

The main problem is not getting the old bearings out, its getting the new ones in level and flush.

The bearings are not usually expensive, but unless you know how, and have the correct tools, I really would not recommend it.

 

 

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revjames
8 hours ago, Richard-the-ninth said:

The main problem is not getting the old bearings out, its getting the new ones in level and flush.

The bearings are not usually expensive, but unless you know how, and have the correct tools, I really would not recommend it.

 

 

Agree. not wrth all the faffing. £200 will get you a machine that will last 10 years. Didnt think you were a scot by birth?

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ProDave
2 minutes ago, revjames said:

Agree. not wrth all the faffing. £200 will get you a machine that will last 10 years. Didnt think you were a scot by birth?

No but circumstances mean I am broke just now, with a half finished house to complete so anything we spend on white goods is money not spent on the house.

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Richard-the-ninth

Trust me, you will regret it if you try yourself.

Have you got a bearing puller?

Do you know how to take your machine apart?

Do you know how to put your machine back together again?

Can you afford to waste time trying the above?

 

Obviously at the end of the day, its your choice, I have seen them changed more than once, a company WM repair bloke takes just under an hour, to take the machine apart as far as he has to, pull the old bearings out (If they don't collapse) pull the new bearings in, change the drum seal (It will leak if you don't change it) and put it all back together, and fill with water and give it a spin. and as I said, he knows what he is doing and has some niffty tool to pull the bearing out and in.
 

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Sidewinder

Rich,

He looks after an old Land Rover, washing machine bearings will be a walk in the park! 😂

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Richard-the-ninth

That's what most people think. Its all the other bits that cause a problem.

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Sharpend

Jeez really you two, there’s not a lot of bits on a old Landy! 

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Sidewinder

Rich,

Like myself, I don't think that ProDave is an average install sparky.

He certainly trained on equipment a bit more complex and challenging than most sparks who work on BS7671 works.

A washing machine, even a new one, is no more complex than a high speed CNC VMC, I regularly repair those without drawings, mechanically and electrically, including ball screw and spindle rebuilds.

I do get the actual ball screws done by a specialist, but I remove, replace and reset them at the machine, and I do repair high speed, 20k rpm spindles myself.

I do draw the line at motor rewinds, but then I have an associate to do that.

I will also tackle a strip down of a 1980's CNC controller and drive rack, and faul find to module level.

Trust me, they are much more difficult to deal with than today's bus controlled modular drives.

 

PD has worked with similar kit, so I don't think he'll struggle with a washing machine.

 

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Onoff

Pity you're so far as I've a bunch of bearing pullers here. :(

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ProDave
49 minutes ago, Onoff said:

Pity you're so far as I've a bunch of bearing pullers here. :(

I have a sprocket puller, but I don't immediately see how it could pull a bearing out., You could hook the 3 legs into the bearing but then there is nothing for the centre screw to pull against.

 

All the links I have seen suggest drifting it out with  bar and a hammer, taking care to keep it square.

 

I am trying to work out the logistics of when to tackle this. I need  a window of time when I am not doing any work so SWMBO can catch up with the washing, then I can start stripping it knowing I have several days to come to a conclusion.

 

I know all the parts are available but want to be sure it's doable before I order them.

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binky

tap around the bearing, hard enough to move it, but don't twot it really hard in 1 spot or it will jam.

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