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James Johnston

Wiring a consumer unit from a cutout

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James Johnston

Wiring a consumer unit from a cutout 

hello need a wiring diagram to wire a consumer unit to a cutout switch, the consumer unit has one rcb and two switches one for a light and one for a socket it's in a temporary builders supply the cutout has takeoff for L and N but im

not sure how to bring the wires into the CU, I can send photos should be self explanatory then thanks 

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James Johnston
20 hours ago, M107 said:

Bored now..................Just to humour you....as you are obviously on a wind up .....................you might want to change the RCD depending on the size of cut out fuse & you'll want a rod (no the water or gas pipe will not tango'd well suffice & neither will the chippys screwdriver)...........not forgetting all the testing thats required.

5afca290401e3_cu2.jpg.2bb52333e447029f971c60ced17ca268.jpg

Are you referring to an earth rod ? Think Screwfix sell those 

20 hours ago, Sharpend said:

No sorry I played once rugby is a poofs game even the ball

is bent .......boom boom 

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Andy™

if you need a wiring diagram for that, you shouldnt be touching it

 

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Murdoch

scary stuff .....................

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ProDave

Agreed. This bread and butter stuff for an electrician and if you have not had training or instruction on how to do it, you should not do it.

 

Quite apart from just knowing how to connect it, are you at all aware of the special earthing arrangements for a temporary supply on a building site?  Hint you do NOT use a PME earth.

 

And do you know the tests you need to do in order to fill in and issue the correct certificate?

 

By all means bodge your own house, but not a building site where others are going to be working and trust that the electrician has done it correctly.

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Tony S

Intelligence has its limits, stupidity has no limits.

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Sharpend

Oh dear! 

James to what level are you trained/qualified? 

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James Johnston
5 hours ago, James Johnston said:

Wiring a consumer unit from a cutout 

hello need a wiring diagram to wire a consumer unit to a cutout switch, the consumer unit has one rcb and two switches one for a light and one for a socket it's in a temporary builders supply the cutout has takeoff for L and N but im

not sure how to bring the wires into the CU, I can send photos should be self explanatory then thanks 

Thanks for the warnings but I think im

almost there, I've used google to see how to wire the rcb and I found a hex screwdriver on eBay for the cutout, I'll probably chicken out tho and get an electrician in at that point as I don't trust three pairs of rubber gloves on the live cutout, ok I'll ask about locally I guess you're right don't risk it with electricity, ok thanks again 

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Andy™

so youre wiring direct to service head with no meter... wonder if the installation consists of mainly lights...

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binky

meter? it's illegal to wire straight to cut-out with no metering ie you have to pay for leccy used.

 

fit mini board, leave long length of tails, and get leccy supplier to fit meter. They will make any connections needed, I am assuming this is a temporary supply for building works, in which case it will have to be a TT set-up

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Murdoch

Wonder what the OP's up to?

 

Clueless homeowner?

Clueless builder?

Clueless "spark"?

 

..................

 

The obvious solution, especially relevant as its for a builders supply is to get it installed, testes, and certified by a competent person ............

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ProDave

The 3 pairs of rubber gloves comment has convinced me this is a wind up..

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James Johnston

Pro Dave I'll explain there's an incoming supply going thru a 100a fuse to a meter then from meter to cutout switch now I fitted a small shed type consumer unit close by all I need to do now is bring two wires from the cutout switch to the 100a (is it mcb) in the cu thereafter from that to the two rcbs it's so basic all I'm asking is where to where even Diane Abbott could add this up there two wires live and neutral  and on the cu switch there's 4 poles 2 live and 2 neutral where on the switch does the live go and where does the neutral go ? It's not rocket science come on guys help me out I'm almost there this is straight up I'm a builder 

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James Johnston

Just to add this is a builders supply it's live metered and certified simply looking to connect a double socket and shed light thanks 

I've posted below the cutout switch and consumer unit for clarity 

IMG_8257.PNG

IMG_8258.PNG

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ProDave

You don't need to do any live working, you have an isolator.

 

What happened to all the bits that should have come with the consumer unit to connect it all together?

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Doc Hudson

It may not be rocket science but there are specific guidelines regarding design and testing of electrical supplies. It is not just a matter of join a live here and a neutral there and switch it on.  There is a whole section in BS7671 wiring regulations about how to ensure electrical safety on temporary installations for construction and demolition sites. As electricity can kill a healthy adult in under half a second, and temporary installations are considered more dangerous than permanent fixed wiring, the most sensible help I would think anyone can offer is for you to employ a competent electrician who can test and verify the incoming supply and earth characteristics to ensure the safety of anyone working in or around your temporary supply. You do appear to be clearly out of your depth in both terminology, knowledge and I would guess the ability to actually test the supply is safe as and when you do get it connected.

 

That fuse box you show in the picture would almost certainly have come with some instructions stating this must be installed by a competent person in accordance with BS7671.  So there are two simple questions to ask, 1/ Are you familiar with the guidance of BS7671 for your proposed work  and 2/ are you competent and have access to appropriate test meters.  If you cannot answer yes to both of those then really you should not touch it. It is for these reasons that most members of the forum will be very cautious about giving advice to people asking questions about work they obviously shouldn't be doing.

 

Doc H

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SLIPSHOD & SLAPDASH
2 hours ago, ProDave said:

The 3 pairs of rubber gloves comment has convinced me this is a wind up..

No s#@t Sherlock 😎

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James Johnston
3 hours ago, ProDave said:

You don't need to do any live working, you have an isolator.

 

What happened to all the bits that should have come with the consumer unit to connect it all together?

Thanks Dave I just realized that the cutout is a switch thanks 

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James Johnston
3 hours ago, Doc Hudson said:

It may not be rocket science but there are specific guidelines regarding design and testing of electrical supplies. It is not just a matter of join a live here and a neutral there and switch it on.  There is a whole section in BS7671 wiring regulations about how to ensure electrical safety on temporary installations for construction and demolition sites. As electricity can kill a healthy adult in under half a second, and temporary installations are considered more dangerous than permanent fixed wiring, the most sensible help I would think anyone can offer is for you to employ a competent electrician who can test and verify the incoming supply and earth characteristics to ensure the safety of anyone working in or around your temporary supply. You do appear to be clearly out of your depth in both terminology, knowledge and I would guess the ability to actually test the supply is safe as and when you do get it connected.

 

That fuse box you show in the picture would almost certainly have come with some instructions stating this must be installed by a competent person in accordance with BS7671.  So there are two simple questions to ask, 1/ Are you familiar with the guidance of BS7671 for your proposed work  and 2/ are you competent and have access to appropriate test meters.  If you cannot answer yes to both of those then really you should not touch it. It is for these reasons that most members of the forum will be very cautious about giving advice to people asking questions about work they obviously shouldn't be doing.

 

Doc H

Thanks Doc I take on board all that you say I agree electricity is dangerous if not tacked correctly but I'm getting there my way of testing would be to plug in a light of it works that's good enough for me, the consumer unit is out of a shed it was wired in it's in good condition with its parts maybe they don't show on the photo, correct me of I'm wrong but the cutout wires enter the cu switch at the top, the neutral exits the switch at the bottom right to the multibar and the bus bar takes the live from the bottom left to the 1,2 or 3 rcb's almost there !  I'll measure up and head to the skip behind the electrical factors tonight to see if I can scrounge some cable let you know how I get on 

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Andy™

just because it works doesnt mean its safe

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ProDave

You are a BUILDER. You have a duty of care to everyone that works on your building site. For gods sake get an electrician to connect it. You must know an electrician or else you are going to have problems wiring the house(s) you are going to build.

 

There is a LOT more to it than connecting L and N and plugging in a lamp to make sure it "works" as Doc has already pointed out. In fact if you only connect L and N then it will be damned well unsafe, even if the lamp does work.

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Sharpend

Janes what area are you in? 

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kerching

:putthekettleon:popcorn

 

keep it up, it is amusing I greatly

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Evans Electric

I'd say if James is doing his own "Builder's supply"   ,  he'll be doing his own electrics too .   Do you do gas too James ? 

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M107
10 hours ago, Murdoch said:

Wonder what the OP's up to?

 

Clueless homeowner?

Clueless builder?

Clueless "spark"?

 

..................

 

The obvious solution, especially relevant as its for a builders supply is to get it installed, testes, and certified by a competent person ............

You forgot 

Clueless grower

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Ardet R

This thread cannot be a real situation; the terminals are fully labelled and you would only need to google images of consumer unit wiring to see where wires go.

The approach and terminology seem to be designed to raise the hackles on any electrician, it would be best just to allow the thread to do what it wants and not get annoyed about it.

If it is not real it is immaterial, if it is real I am sure we will stop hearing from the poster fairly soon because of the hazards to which he is exposing himself and others.

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