Jump to content

DONT STAY LURKING AS A GUEST,

JOIN TEF AND BENEFIT FROM MEMBERSHIP:

CLICK HERE TO JOIN.
Murdoch

In this months PE ...............

Recommended Posts

ProDave
1 hour ago, Sidewinder said:

I don't think you would get a DNO doing a job like that.

Yes they work live, but that was a bit OTT.

If, something had gone wrong, the downtime would have been much more than the shutdown time to do it safely.

I should have put the tongue in cheek smiley on the end of my post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Evans Electric

I never quite figured where that guy was coming from to be honest .I've met a few in my time .    

 

Jointing live is a different kettle of fish ,      imagine trying to shove your hand up behind the bars to push a bolt through , drop the lug on ,  spin a nut on , then get two spanners on , thrashing about between phases or earth ....utter madness. 

They were always skimping on stuff ...  if they quoted a job and it needed  4 X 4   trunking ,   they'd send out  3 X 3  .  Remember we were just employees then ,  you havn't worked out how many cables there will be ,  its all done above your head 

 

 

Then as always happened , halfway through you would realize it was too small . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
misssweden
20 hours ago, ProDave said:

^^ what was wrong with that procedure. DNO works live all the time. Ask miss Sweedy.

 

Even I would want that one dead. 😜 Just because jointers are slightly nuts doesn’t mean we’re suicidal. 

19 hours ago, Andy™ said:

they have proper procedues and the proper tools / PPE. simply disconnecting an earth from a drill so it doesnt go bang isnt really suitable...

 

Proper procedures in this case would have been to do it dead. There’s only so much you can do with rubber gloves and insulated tools. We’re mud monkeys, not magicians. 😜

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Evans Electric

The instance I describe was long before  the phrase Health & Safety ...risk assessments  etc .      In reality , had I followed his instructions I would have been fried on the bus bars .  They were a typical  small contractor  of that time ....wobbly steps...van with poor brakes  ....compared with today , Health & Safety on a scale of  1  to  10  would score about 0.5 

 

They had a stores at the yard with a storeman  who was a pain .   Two annoying things I remember   :-

1)   We used a lot of 1/4" drills  either for trunking pins  or the centre drill for our useless Enox tank cutters  for drilling 3/4" holes for conduit.

          Ask for a couple of 1/4" drills  and you got 5/32"   that didn't fit  the Enox cutters .   Reason ??   5/32" is a clearance size for 1/4"     No good arguing , he stood firm . 

           Trying to be clever .        We used to swap them with the pipe fitters  on site .

2)      Ask for a 12" hacksaw blade  Eclipse .   " Are you cutting 6" trunking ? "  No  " Then you can't have one  , just a 10"  flexi Ding-Dong  blade  because you all keep breaking them "     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kerching
7 minutes ago, Evans Electric said:

just a 10"  flexi Ding-Dong  blade  because you all keep breaking them "     

I have a Ding Dong hacksaw....must be 40 years old at least and it is still my best one ( even better than the IT and Facom 1000V ones!) BUT, pray tell, what is a flexible Ding dong blade?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Evans Electric

AT LAST !!!!   Something that Kerch has never heard of   :slap:coat:):happybunny:

 

They were cheapskates  Kerch  .  So you know what apprentices were like for breaking  hacksaw blades  ...  bearing in mind most jobs were  steel conduit  , we were cutting & threading for weeks on end  sometimes  on bigger jobs  and eventually the rigid Eclipse blade would  snap .

They couldn't bear to give you a box of Eclipse blades ...you just got one ! 

So they discovered these Ding - Dong  FLEXIBLE  blades   , black in colour ,  the blade could be bent almost double  BUT  lost it's cutting edge after a day  and resembled a smooth , shiny  metal strip , the laughing stock of pipe fitters on every job.   

 

It was even worse to get a new  Rawlplug  jumper bit     ( I know you remember these )   He used to inspect the old one before issuing a new one .  

 

I described this on here a few times .....  we were installing the lighting etc on a new multi storey car park  ...great long runs of steel conduit & through boxes  fixed to concrete .      We all sat on top of steps   Rawlplugging saddle fixings when we heard s strange noise from lower floors .  

Someone went down and came scuttling back  , agog ...   " The Sprinkler guys have got drills that hammer "    

Our firm was so old fashioned  we were still plugging fixings by hand ..... the Sprinkler guys were leaving us standing .

Edited by Evans Electric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kerching

Just realised.....those Eclipse blades weren't the double edged ones were they?....about 2" wide?

 

if so we called them "plumbers blades"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Evans Electric

Some of them were !!!!  I'd forgotten about those  pieces of  pooh ,  you couldn't saw a straight line to save your life with them .   Don't  think they were Eclipse brand though  ...they were Ding -Dong too 

Edited by Evans Electric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Geoff1946

Ah yes, industrial storemen, a breed apart, protecting their domain!

 

Can I have an XYZ please?

Sorry no, I've only got one.

Well i only need one.

I've been told I've always to keep at least one on the shelf.

Why?

In case it's needed...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ProDave

^^ or the modern version

 

Sorry it's out of stock

But I can see one on the shelf right there

Sorry, the computer says it is out of stock so I can't let you have it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kerching

Usually wearing a brown warehouse coat, shirt, tie. All  biros neatly arranged in a weird spring clip affair in top pocket.

 

the elite also carried a small slide rule as well as it made them look clever

Edited by kerching

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
roys

Some of the store men also had rainman memories for 8 digit stock numbers for example:

"I need a 20S SWA gland"

"so you want a 12068423"

"yes please"

"sorry none in stock"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tony S

If I wanted cable glands, locknuts, more or less anything from stores, I’d order 50 off of each and put them in the plant squirrel stores, free issue from there on.

 

Fun when you get a call from stores “there’s three great big switch panels blocking the stores up where do you want them delivering?” “I don’t want them, the switchroom is still a pile of bricks.” When we did get the panels delivered, 2/3rd of them went back to Brush as substandard (scrap).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Evans Electric
11 hours ago, kerching said:

Usually wearing a brown warehouse coat, shirt, tie. All  biros neatly arranged in a weird spring clip affair in top pocket.

 

the elite also carried a small slide rule as well as it made them look clever

You met him too then ?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kerching
48 minutes ago, Evans Electric said:

You met him too then ?  

Many many times 

 

did yours use 'chits' or 'dockets'?   And were they attached to a home made clipboard, again with a springy clip holding the 1" long pencil attached with a piece of that hairy/sisal string?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Evans Electric

No clipboard with this guy  but I've seen them  in loads of factories .      We always had to sign a "Chitty"  , which he kept forever to use against you if requested the same item too many times .    (  " Well you had a 12" hacksaw blade two years ago .....I have a record of it!!!!!!!)       

 

I worked for many contractors between coming on the tools and becoming self employed .      One firm  insisted we all turn up at the office every day and  fill in that day on the time sheet .  Couple of reasons for this ,  once someone's wife phoned in  , medical emergency ,  no one knew where he was working .     The other reasons  were  the gaffer knew if you were late  and he didn't have to pay travelling time  to the jobs  as it was after 8.00am .   

 

Because of the mistrust no one ever got to site until 9.30 ....10.00  after the caff and tended to go home early .  Result was none of the jobs came in on time .  

Oh except for "The  Running Man"       He would be outside the office  before 8.00  so he could get the post off the postman  to hand to the gaffer . 

I saw him open the gaffer's car door once .    

Gaffer would hand out job cards for small jobs around the city centre  and this guy would leave at the trot to get there quickly .   We followed him once in the van ,  he kept running all the way ...not just round the corner to impress the boss .

 

 

Edited by Evans Electric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ProDave
1 hour ago, kerching said:

Many many times 

 

did yours use 'chits' or 'dockets'?   And were they attached to a home made clipboard, again with a springy clip holding the 1" long pencil attached with a piece of that hairy/sisal string?

Local stores required a chit in singular. Main stores required the same chit with 3 copies.  No clipboard though. And someone had to sign the chit to authorise it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kerching

We're chits and dockets stored on a vertical steel spike on a wooden base OR the hi tech question mark shaped unit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Evans Electric
7 hours ago, kerching said:

We're chits and dockets stored on a vertical steel spike on a wooden base OR the hi tech question mark shaped unit?

The question mark spike is the Health & Safety version . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Terms of UseWe have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.