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anthonyleeds

Quickest way to become a domestic installer after many years' experience

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anthonyleeds

Hello,

 

I worked as an electrical apprentice from age 16 - 23. I feel I'm very competent when it comes to domestic installations.

 

Unfortunately, through my own fault, I never gained all my qualifications at college (I only completed part one of my course).

 

I am now 33 and after a number of years away from the trade, would like to get back into self-employed domestic electrical work.

 

What would be the quickest way for me to get the necessary qualifications to become a domestic installer?

 

Thanks in advance for your advice.

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Andy™

as much as i hate the short courses, they may be suitable as you would already have the advantage you know most of it anyway

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anthonyleeds
Just now, Andy™ said:

as much as i hate the short courses, they may be suitable as you would already have the advantage you know most of it anyway

 

Yes, I've heard many sparkies saying bad things about them, but I feel they are beneficial to people in my position.

 

I've been on hundreds of domestic jobs (rewires, faultfinding, general maintenance, consumer unit changes etc.) and would only ever attempt something that I feel 100% competent in.

 

What route do you think I should take? Thanks.

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Doc Hudson

I was always under the impression that the original concept of the short course path, was for people who have; on site experience, and limited qualifications. To bring them up-to-speed with current regs and part P. and to meet the basic qualification requirements needed to join one of the various approved bodies to allow self-certification of their work. Which to me sounds as though you are a typical candidate. Unlike some who try to use them as career change courses going from Postman, or Shopkeeper, or Insurance call-centre sales person, or Painter & Decorater etc. Into "just doing domestic electrics" as they felt like a change!

 

What I think you need to do is decide which scheme you want to register with, so you can sign off all your own notifiable jobs.  Then check exactly what their enrolment criteria are. Maybe worth ringing them up to confirm you are following the best route.  Then get yourself on the most economical package of courses to bring you up to the level for your membership assessment.

 

Doc H

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Sharpend

I’d look into this in depth, as you have not got any full qualifications then in the eyes of a prospective employer you are no better than any other short course applicant. 

You may have some experience which will benefit you and possibly them but the nuts and bolts of qualifications will be a stumbling block. 

At some point along the path you may/will need to apply for an ECS card and will need the qualifications in order to get it. 

It’s ok saying that you want to be a self employed domestic spark but reality is it’s a tough workplace, competition is high and racing to the bottom so you may have no choice to go looking elsewhere for work ie subbing, agency, etc. 

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Evans Electric

Anthonyleeds    May I suggest you write out a CV  outlining all your previous experience , contact one of the  Part P schemes for an initial assessment .  In the main , their criteria is to assess that you are competent  to carry out domestic work  , ( other types of work are not considered )  .

As you will read on here , schemes only exist by recruiting members  & cashing the cheque .   Its not like being questioned by the police ..they want you as a member as much as you want them  .  

 

So , comply with their other requirements ,  organize a couple of domestic jobs you can re-visit and attain the following :- 

1)    Copy of the  EAWR    ( Electricity at Work Regulations ) 

2)   Latest Regs .

3)   Building Regs Approved Doc P 

4)   A Written Health & Safety policy.

5)  Some risk assessment forms.

6)  Produce some written quotes.

7)  Suitable test instruments   ( Insul / continuity / RCD / Loop imp ) 

8)  Calibration certs for the above.

9)  Public Liability Insurance  up to £2 million cover   ( Not too expensive)  (Don't mention welding / soldering . or gas torches )) If you're not doing  industrial then you don't want 3 phase  415V   either.  

 

By talking to you  & asking questions they   will assess your knowledge & competence .....general knowledge of Building Regs is good.... lets face it , if you look  , act , talk & walk like a sparks  ...then you must be a sparks.    You need to show you have a working knowledge of the Regs  , Special Locations etc .  If you don't .....well you should to be honest . 

 

Start with Stroma  as your scheme  ( it doesn't have to be the NICEIC)  Stroma are around half the cost of the others .

They may want you to do the 17th   or 18th  edition course ,  I don't know ...but once you're in ....you're in .  

You probably have more experience than most of the Short Course  guys .....go for it 

Edited by Evans Electric

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apprentice87

Ok, now i am no expert at this,, and i am not an electrician anyway [so what would i know] but once with a "scheme" [so you are working] can you not just do an NVQ3 with the local college?? This is, as far as i know, assessed on the job so would be perfect for you.. Not sure what written exams would have to be passed though..

 

Anyone out there done an NVQ??

 

john..

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Tony S
2 hours ago, apprentice87 said:

 

Anyone out there done an NVQ??

 

 

Yes, in management studies :Salute

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apprentice87

What was that like to do??

 

john..

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Tony S

@apprentice87

 

Sodding awful, I’ve never been so bored/annoyed in my life.

 

I did industrial law as a convenor for the EETPU, then I had employers law rammed down my neck at De-Montfort for the company. I prefer the union collage.

 

The bit the company couldn’t get their head around was I could see two sides to an argument.

 

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Evans Electric
17 hours ago, Tony S said:

The bit the company couldn’t get their head around was I could see two sides to an argument.

Well they wouldn't want that would they !!     That must thrown them . 

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