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werdnarolyat

Cable Runs and Conduit

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werdnarolyat

Hi all,

 

Hopefully I've posted this in the correct forum.

 

I’m in the process of running some telephone and ethernet cabling to my living room as well setting up some cable management where the TV etc. will be located.

 

The sockets I have planned are a single gang faceplate with RJ11 and RJ45 euromodules (to be used for phone and potential future wireless access point) and a double gang faceplate with satellite and RJ45 euromodules.

 

I was planning on using oval conduit (22mm or 25mm) in the chases to run cable from beneath the floor to the sockets.

 

  • Is it OK to run the phone cable (CW1308) and cat 6 cable in the same conduit?
  • Should the satellite cable and cat 6 be run in separate conduit?

 

I was also planning on using a combination of brush plates and a chase to run power, HDMI, satellite, and ethernet to the TV so that cables are hidden.

 

  • Is it acceptable to put the TV kettle lead in the wall chase?  I have Googled this but have not found a definitive answer.
  • Am I missing anything?

 

Any advice would be great.

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Sidney

Data, phone and satellite will be fine in the same conduit. Running AC power next to data cables is problematic due to interference from the AC magnetic fields. Also the insulation rating of the data cable must be same as that of the AC cable which many aren't. If necessary they can cross at 90 degrees to each other.

 

I would be wary of putting a kettle lead into a wall chase as the outer sheath may not be suitable for burial in plaster, also if you need to change it things would get a bit messy. Nothing wrong with putting the kettle lead in it's own conduit.

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werdnarolyat

Thanks Sidney.

 

I was planning on using conduit to run the kettle lead between brush plates.  Is oval conduit the best for this application?

 

I was also conscious of running the power cable and data cable in parallel up the chase even though it's a short distance.  To compensate for this I was planning on having the chase the width of a double gang socket to allow me to keep the power and data apart; I also thought about using a shielded Ethernet jumper cable in the chase to hopefully minimise interference.

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ProDave

Run AT LEAST 2 separate conduits down to the brush plate, one for the mains lead, one for hdmi etc.  you will need at least 25mm conduit to get an hdmi plug through, and you will only get the tv mains lead down by cutting the plug off and fitting a rewirable plug on.  do you remember how to do that?  (a lot of people have NEVER fitted a 13A plug, it was something I learned at a very early age)

Edited by ProDave

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kerching

Sometimes a 90° kettle plug is a better option to allow TV to sit flatter to the wall.   Available,from my Corner Shop (CPC)

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Murdoch

Op - I’m reading this as if you want the tv mounted on a bracket on the wall - if this is the case, I recommend you buy the bracket and drill the mount holes before you Do any chasing ........

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werdnarolyat

Thanks everyone.

 

ProDave, I should be OK to rewire the plug.

 

Kerching,  I just checked and the plug is slim and is at a right angle.  I'll check out CPC anyway; looks like a good resource for future use.

 

Murdoch, that's a good point.  The plan is to mount the TV on the wall so I'll get the bracket looked out and do a dry run.

 

 

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werdnarolyat

Hello again, I have a follow up question I was hoping for advice with.

 

I'm planning on using metal backboxes to mount the brushplates on.  However, the metal cut outs aren't large enough to pass through all my cabling (e.g. HDMI).

 

Could I just cut off the side of the box where the cut outs are? 

 

Would the absence of a side on the back box impact what the plasterer will do? I was thinking they'd need a solid edge so they can fill the wall chase.

 

I've also read that backboxes aren't necessary for the brushplates and you can just screw into the wall. Again, I'm not clear how that would work when the plasterer is filling the chase.

 

Any advice would be great thanks.

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roys

I would try and keep the main body of your backbox intact and enlarge one of the 20mm knockout holes to 25mm either by using something like a cone drill (Screwfix 5911V for example) or a half round file. Put a 25mm grommet over the hdmi plug on the cable first then put the plug end through the new 25mm hole then fit the grommet on. Or if you are using the oval conduit and it fits through the hole stick it into the backbox by about 10mm, then no need for the grommet.

Edited by roys
Additional

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Murdoch
47 minutes ago, werdnarolyat said:

Again, I'm not clear how that would work when the plasterer is filling the chase.

 


 

I would advise you against plastering over your hdmi cable ..... 

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Andy™

if the wall if thick enough, id suggest putting something like 32 or 40mm underground duct in instead, then you can easily pull through HDMI cables etc

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werdnarolyat

Many thanks for the replies. 

 

Just for clarity, I'm using PVC conduit; the cables won't be exposed to the plaster. I just wasn't sure of the best way for the cables to leave/enter the backbox.

 

I'll look into enlarging the cutouts on the backbox and I'll have a look at the ducting suggested.

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