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Jcnfch

Safely Powering LEDs

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Jcnfch

I would appreciate some help with powering an LED strip to replace an existing fluorescent cabinet light in the kitchen. The only reason I didn't buy an off the shelf, ready to go product was that I will be replicating the below on another two cabinets and want to be able to have them connected as one zone so colours and dim change at the same time via a RF controller I have.

 

On top of the cabinet is this junction box https://imgur.com/BcnyuLw, I plan on using a transformer/driver such as this one https://www.downlightsdirect.co.uk/25w-mains-dimmable-led-driver-powerled.html connecting to a dimmable controller https://imgur.com/4uXAI86, to power an RGBW Led strip which is 1.4m long and rated at 12w per meter.

 

What I would appreciate advice on is

  1. I need a transformer with a minimum 17w output, so something a little extra between 20-25w should do the trick?
  2. There currently seems to be no earth for the power from the junction box to the existing light, is this correct?
  3. Does it matter if the transformer output is 12v or 24v, as the LED controller seems compatible with both?
  4. Is the plan as outlined in the first paragraph ok, and, anything I may have overlooked?

 

I only know the basics when it comes to electrics and just want some reassurance that what I’m wiring is safe. I cannot get an electrician at the minute due to the lockdown measures in Northern Ireland, only essential and emergency work/repairs allowed currently…. plus I like putting my hand to things and learning new skills. 

 

Many thanks

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Geoff1946

The led controller may be both 12/24 compatible  but the strip won't. Match your supply to your strip.

You only need to earth any exposed metal which isn't double insulated. Can't speak for the old fluorescent but you new gear shouldn't have any.

And yes its good practice to have a little power capacity in hand. The transformer will run cooler and so live longer. I don't think you need a dimmable one as pictured though it probably doesn't matter except costing a little more. 

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Murdoch

My advice to the OP is to source all 3 parts from the same supplier, then if it doesn’t work, or goes wrong quickly then you have 1 supplier to deal with....

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