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Evans Electric

Two of the most useful items in my kit .

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Evans Electric

Not being the tallest of folk  , the folding  2 step -up  was an excellent buy . 

And the home made cable spooler is a must .   

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Murdoch

My trusty 2nd hand iphone SE

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roys

Battery drill especially now that the battery life is long even on hammer action, can you imagine going back to a bit and brace and douking irons.

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Evans Electric
19 minutes ago, roys said:

bit and brace and douking irons.

Brace & bit I remember  ...but  douking irons  :C           Would they be ...augers ?   

 

There was even an Electrician's Swing Brace ......  it had a shallow crank so you could fit it  in a floor space  & crank  it .  Hard work due to lack of leverage .

Edited by Evans Electric

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SPECIAL LOCATION

Wago connectors...

 

AND..

 

A re-threading tool.....

e.g. something like:

https://www.screwfix.com/p/c-k-re-threading-tool-m3-5-x-0-6mm/59312

 

( The number or lettuced threads on back-boxes..

OR

the number of accessory screws that are so soft..

that crossed threads are 99.999999% certain if you haven't re-cut the back-box before hand!

 

Guinness   

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roys
8 hours ago, Evans Electric said:

Brace & bit I remember  ...but  douking irons  :C           Would they be ...augers ?   

 

Douking irons were like a masonary bit with a fat body which you held, you use to hit it the top of it with a hammer, turn it 90deg then hit it again, repeat many many times until hole was deep enough, about 10 minutes to do one hole, remember having to do it at the very start of my apprenticeship then we were given 110V hammer action drills with Masonary bits.

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Evans Electric

AAAHHHH!      You mean a Rawlplug Tool   .     A hexagon shaped shaft that took a hardened , fluted "Jumper" bit   No. 8   .   The dreaded Plugging tool  , as you say , 10 to 15 mins  to plug a hole for a No. 8 wooden Rawlplug  ..as opposed to 2 seconds with an SDS.  today.   And an aching arm.

The plugging action was , strike with hammer , twist shaft ...strike...twist ..strike...twist   ,..ad infinitum .

 

I told this before on here..... when an apprentice we did the electrics on a new build multi storey car park in Brum ,   Holiday Street .  After twanging a chalkline  we were  all sitting on top of steps ,  Rawlplugging the concrete  ceiling  for saddles to carry the steel lighting  conduit  .  Row after row  .   

We could hear a strange noise coming up from below that reverberated through the building .     We found it was the fire sprinkler guys  using a strange  red device called a Hilti  ...which punched a fixing hole in concrete  in 2 seconds  for their pipe brackets .        

It was a big wake-up call to our company who were a huge contractor but obviously lagging behind .......  the sprinkler guy's pipework was flying in  while we still plugged away by hand.

 

I still have  a plugging tool  somewhere .  

 

Kerch will know these well   ....he still uses them  :innocent

Edited by Evans Electric

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roys

Deke you just made me go out to an old inheritated tool box as I knew I had some of those horrible vintage Rawlplug inserts.😀

Look what I found

4BD12489-ACE9-4EC6-B738-DF23D26B766A.jpeg

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kerching
5 hours ago, Evans Electric said:

Kerch will know these well   ....he still uses them  

Nah....I,was one of the first in the UK to own a Makita cordless drill... 7.2V  I think

 

19 hours ago, Evans Electric said:

was even an Electrician's Swing Brace ......  it had a shallow crank so you could fit it  in a floor space  & crank  it .  Hard work due to lack of leverage .

Got one!

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Evans Electric
5 hours ago, roys said:

Deke you just made me go out to an old inheritated tool box as I knew I had some of those horrible vintage Rawlplug inserts.😀

Look what I found

4BD12489-ACE9-4EC6-B738-DF23D26B766A.jpeg

Thats them  Roys  ,  they look like the bigger sizes  than the No 8  ...10s & 14s   perhaps. 

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NozSpark

Deke...... be very careful with those kinds of steps.... this is a photo of mine from Feb 2017..

I badly sprained my ankle and was off work for a couple of weeks,,,, and still feeling the pain now as I now have arthritis in my ankle

 

DSC_0022.thumb.jpeg.d5c3d04c36be636e885c59d58bba7832.jpeg

DSC_0057.jpeg

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SPECIAL LOCATION

I still have one.....  :D

6140967_RAWLPLUGTOOL.thumb.JPG.195a52d01f7be5949a562b3f47cb2f6b.JPG

 

So what are these  D...R....I....L....L....   things you talk of??

 

I get the impression some of you no longer have to manually hammer away all day to fix your screws into the wall....:|

 

I thought everybody had to use these when the power is off while you are extending new circuits??  :o

 

Sounds like I need to invest in one of these D..R..I..L..L..S.??  (whatever they are?)   :C

 

:innocent

 

:coat

   

 

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roys
41 minutes ago, SPECIAL LOCATION said:

I still have one.....  :D

   

 

I have a few spare inserts if you want them😀

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Evans Electric
14 hours ago, SPECIAL LOCATION said:

I thought everybody had to use these when the power is off while you are extending new circuits??  :o

 

Sounds like I need to invest in one of these D..R..I..L..L..S.??  (whatever they are?)   :C

That looks like an early Roman one Specs   ....I only ever saw the hex shaped barrels .        There was a wedge shaped drift for knocking the jumper bit out when worn  but they were always missing .        Accepted bit removal was to bang the barrel  against the hammer  until it flew out & hit you in the eye.   

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Evans Electric

Some tools I don't seem to use anymore  .

 

Anyone , other than Kerch , know what the strange Mole wrench is for ?   

 Also shown is the universal Pyro stripper.  

The universal Pyro dressing hammer.

Locknut spanner  

Bush spanner

Hack knife for lead sheath  SWA .  

And as discussed on other thread ...the mighty Rawlplugging Tool 

IMG_20200926_132804.jpg

IMG_20200926_132943.jpg

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poni
2 hours ago, Evans Electric said:

Locknut spanner

bush spanner??

you forgot the potting tool for wedge pots

 

Edited by poni

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Geoff1946

Go on then. What's the modified mole wrench for?  I can identify most tools but not that one.

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kerching
1 hour ago, Geoff1946 said:

Go on then. What's the modified mole wrench for?  I can identify most tools but not that one.

Well I have TWO of them!😂

My OhmTite got lifted years ago, only have the BushKing left now.  Problem is it doesn't like the el crappo bushes that are now smaller. OhmTite was good as you could nip the bush up with cables already in it

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Evans Electric
4 hours ago, Geoff1946 said:

Go on then. What's the modified mole wrench for?  I can identify most tools but not that one.

Poni  spotted that one  ,   they brought in MICC   pots that had a wedge style of fitting to the cable  instead of screwing  ...the modified Mole wrench  were for cramping the pot onto the wedge .  

 

The Ohm-tite   is a bush tightener  ....doesn't work on today's bushes as theres hardly any metal in them .

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kerching

...and if you rotate the "sticky out bit with the pin on it" ( tech term, sorry if I've lost you, deal with it!😂 ) and shove it up to the retaining point you use it to crimp,the seal on the pot. Advantage was that it did a 360° crimp and not 3 dents

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binky

Been trying to think of the most useful items in my tool bag, :-

 

1/ a stumpy hammer, great for when you can't swing a proper one - an ALDI special, plus no-one ever 'borrows' it! 

2/ a magnet, which is normally attached to the my drill. It's great for holding a few screws, so when you are up a ladder and drop a screw, you have another. Also useful for those small jobs like fitting 1 light for a customer as it saves taking the screw box in woth you.

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NozSpark

Talking of magnets.... I've just bought one of these, they make measuring out down lights so easy

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/CH-Hanson-03040-Stud-Finder/dp/B000IKK0OI/ref=pd_rhf_gw_p_img_4?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=PH7RYCEG3HNC9W7B504T

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roys

I use the magnet out of a hard drive for finding the screwheads in studs. Used in a couple of days age for hanging up a coat hook rail.

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SPECIAL LOCATION
8 hours ago, binky said:

Been trying to think of the most useful items in my tool bag, :-

 

1/ a stumpy hammer, great for when you can't swing a proper one - an ALDI special, plus no-one ever 'borrows' it! 

 

I have an Aldi Stumpy Hammer..  

(think it was £2.99 or £3.99)...

 

must admit it is a very useful tool!!!

gets used loads of times!!!

 

1156183834_ALDISTUMPYHAMMER.thumb.JPG.8c206a5b4ec6c359e9fbe817b77fb439.JPG

 

 

Guinness

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kerching

I have the same along with the claw version. Ball pein is better as it doesn't catch when you take it out of your pocket

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