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General Advice (just starting up)


Guest Dane

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Im just starting up my self have been in trade a while. and decided to go self employed.

I am having to get all new tools :( well most!

Hand tool wise i am fine.

My thing at the minute is i see a lot of people using tools that are 230v ... now i cant decided whether to go 230v or 110v

Ive got a genny that can do both if required.

Ive got 110v tranny already

Ive also got the proper extensions for 110v stuff.

Mainly looking at a SDS drill i know i would be better with cordless, but funds at the moment just dont justify me spending out on a cordless SDS drill.

So what do people think? Mains tools... 230 or 110

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Mains 110v

AndyGuiness Drink

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LOL I will be tucked up in bed, My ankle is killing Me.

AndyGuiness Drink

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Depends what sort of work you are going to do! Just domestic then 230V - no pesky tranny to carry about. What's the duty cycle like on your tranny?

If you are going on site 110Vis a must!

Usually the same drill in either variant is same money

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Well work will vary... ive not advertised yet, and got some reasonable jobs in (3 new builds, 1 rewire (big one) and some other bits and bobs)

Got a mate who helps me he has plenty of cordless.

The tranny ive got duty cycle i cant think, (been doing 14 hour days) but i know it will power a big chisel breaker thing. . (thats what we used it for)

i dont mind luggin tranny about, end of day its my hands that are holding the tools

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For all site work where other trades are present you will need 110v.

For most domestic you can get away with 240v providing you are a sole trader!

If you are a LTD company under the rules or terms for public liability and employers liability they may request all tools used on site, which includes domestic, to be 110v.

More and more are now using cordless as a better alternative, and they have massively come down in prices.

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depends mostly where your working. for site work, youll be lucky if your allowed to use 230v. i have a mixture of 110v & 230v drills. i even have a 110-230v transformer for chargers (or, at a site a while back, they had a strict 110v only system and no 230v sockets in the building. nothing was said about me getting a 230v supply from a 3 phase socket though!)

but for domestic and most use, its 230v. save carrying the transformer into the house, but for most jobs, the cordless sds is more than enough

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If you are a LTD company under the rules or terms for public liability and employers liability they may request all tools used on site, which includes domestic, to be 110v.

first ive heard of that one... i only use 110v when i have to. i know all my 230v stuff is safe, so why shouldnt i be allowed to use it. next they will ban 110v transformers because there is no 110v supply to plug it into?!

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I noticed it on one of my anual renewal quotes for employers liability.

Most domestic stuff is 240v, and I still use it.

We do on larger domestics use 110v, because other trades are present.

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The cost of a cordless SDS though compared to a SDS drill is like 3 times more for cordless! I would go down that route if i didnt need to get some other things aswell, but at the minute ive just not got that amount to splash onto tools. As im trying to set up without going into negative figures (daft as it sounds, i am managing)

In say 4 or 5 weeks, when ive got more spare i obviously will go cordless. but right now i just need something to "make do" but thinking 110v then covered either way

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The cost of a cordless SDS though compared to a SDS drill is like 3 times more for cordless! I would go down that route if i didnt need to get some other things aswell, but at the minute ive just not got that amount to splash onto tools. As im trying to set up without going into negative figures (daft as it sounds, i am managing)

In say 4 or 5 weeks, when ive got more spare i obviously will go cordless. but right now i just need something to "make do" but thinking 110v then covered either way

cordless has many advantages over corded... especially at the top of a ladder!

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The cost of a cordless SDS though compared to a SDS drill is like 3 times more for cordless! I would go down that route if i didnt need to get some other things aswell, but at the minute ive just not got that amount to splash onto tools. As im trying to set up without going into negative figures (daft as it sounds, i am managing)

In say 4 or 5 weeks, when ive got more spare i obviously will go cordless. but right now i just need something to "make do" but thinking 110v then covered either way

Have you seen this

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/92579/Power-Tools/Kits/Hitachi-18V-Triple-Pack?ts=74758

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cordless has many advantages over corded... especially at the top of a ladder!

I am fully aware of that

but to be simple

Ive not got the money splash onto a cordless SDS with rotary stop.

My other option is get 2.... one with rotary stop and a cheaper cordless without.

But again trying to do this without negative figures.

Ive already got a standard cordless drill, torch etc, so that kit wouldn't really be of use (plus i hate that name) yes i am picky with names sometimes!!

headbangheadbang exactly how i currently feel haha

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i think this is a really good deal:http://www.screwfix.com/search.do;jsessionid=T3WFSDECQBTOYCSTHZOSFFQ?_dyncharset=UTF-8&fh_search=Bosch+2kg+SDS+Hammer+%26+Free+Drill+Driver&ts=75019

u cant go wrong with that, its not going to break the bank.

i still use a second hand 110v hitachi i bought off ebay three years ago for

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Bosch 12 more volts

same Ah in the batteries

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that bosch get a good recommendation from me. got one a few month ago and so far had no problems with it. battery capacity can be a pain at times, but it has 3 batteries so its just a case of swap battery and continue. the batteries also have a status indicator so you can easily see whats charged and what needs charged. its also very light, especially compared to my older 24v dewalt sds. and the makita is about the same weight weight as the dewalt. only downside is it doesnt have hammer only, so the old dewalt is used for that (but only for short jobs - it only has 1 partly working battery left!

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Go with the 110v first, that will cover you for commercial and domestic. ( Bosch SDS)

I wouldn't buy a cordless other than the small ones ( not less than 18v) SDS cordless don't have the umph of a powered one and all that battery charging is a pain. Plus they cost a fortune ,so do the batteries. Drill a hole with a big masonary bit and the battery is soon going flat.

You will usually have to pay more for 110v tools.

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Corded it is then, after a sleep i think at this moment in time corded is the more sensible option too. Frees me up couple 100 to get some other bits and bobs aswell.

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