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Connection blocks / terminals


dom2464

Question

I am just about to change a old 3036 type CU for a new 17th Edition CU but the problem is that in the limited space I have to put the new CU I will have to lengthen some of the wires to reach the new CU and was wondering what are the best connection blocks / terminals to use to do this?

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if you have a few to do, could you not use a adaptable box with din rail and din rail terminals?

for that sort of thing, din rail and klippons win everytime for me. or the wagos that go on din rail, but i havnt seen or used them...

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Would these be ok to be used when the NICEIC inspector comes out to see my work, would they be happy that I have used this method?

If your NICEIC inspector is anything like ours you could just twist and tape your connections as he won't be interested in your practical work, just whats written on your certificates!!!

We always crimp but I'm thinking of getting some WAGOs after some of the threads Ive read on here.

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for that sort of thing, din rail and klippons win everytime for me. or the wagos that go on din rail, but i havnt seen or used them...

Available online

http://secure.wago.ltd.uk/shop/department/terminals_2002_series/

the whole range from the menu bar on the LHS

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for that sort of thing, din rail and klippons win everytime for me. or the wagos that go on din rail, but i havnt seen or used them...

I guess you don't use the earth klippons thenPray.. They'd right screw with you r2 ring readings:^O

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I guess you don't use the earth klippons thenPray.. They'd right screw with you r2 ring readings:^O

i do but only on big jobs for someone else, by the time testing comes im doing something else but nothing has ever needed to be altered.

are they bad then?

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I know I risk the wrath of Apache for resurrecting an old thread but what's the best way of joining 10mm? Just doing a rewire and after getting all the cable to the site of the new CU it's been decided (not by me) to relocate it 3 metres away. So i'm a bit stuffed. The Wagos have done up to 6mm which takes in all but the shower circuit.

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SAK10 Klippon terminals on DIN rail. Don't forget to get a couple of end stops and an end shield to suit. The 10 in SAK10 means suitable for 10mm. Mount it all in a nice JB.

Cheers Steve

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I know I risk the wrath of Apache for resurrecting an old thread but what's the best way of joining 10mm? Just doing a rewire and after getting all the cable to the site of the new CU it's been decided (not by me) to relocate it 3 metres away. So i'm a bit stuffed. The Wagos have done up to 6mm which takes in all but the shower circuit.

I like old threads. :D

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bit of a late reply but anyway...

i often use 100x50 above CU, cut a side from it large slot from top of CU. strip all cables back in trunking and it makes a very neat/tidy board

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Not really, but the earth klippons (DIN rail terminals) don't just clip on to the DIN rail, they actually connect (electrically) to the DIN rail

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Well there you go, learnt something already, our standards at work don't allow us to use crimps on solid drawn cable, is that just our electrical engineer having an unfounded bee in his bonnet, and I could have been using crimps all this time? Depending on the job it is either term block or din rail with Klippons that we use.

Cheers Steve

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Some like crimps (how much room have you got?)

Some use terminal blocks

Some use push connectors eg Wago, but Andyc linked to some nice cheap ones here

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Another vote for the Wago's (just make sure you use ones rated high enough for the circuit as the standard push ones are rated at 24A and the leaver ones are 32A).

Ian.

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Thanks for the quick replies Applaud Smiley

So these would be fine then,

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/2-LEVER-WAGO-ELECTRIC-CONNECTOR-x-50_W0QQitemZ290315839277QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_DIY_Material_Electrical_Fittings_MJ?hash=item43982c272d&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

Would these be ok to be used when the NICEIC inspector comes out to see my work, would they be happy that I have used this method?

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for that sort of thing, din rail and klippons win everytime for me. or the wagos that go on din rail, but i havnt seen or used them...

Din rail and klippons for me as well if all circuits needed extending far quicker to install.

Wago use there normal fittings which are then placed into a din rail adapter.

From experiance I have found them to be very fiddely and not secure at all.

For the odd few circuits I crimp through, providing the connection is inside the cu.

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Well there you go, learnt something already, our standards at work don't allow us to use crimps on solid drawn cable, is that just our electrical engineer having an unfounded bee in his bonnet, and I could have been using crimps all this time? Depending on the job it is either term block or din rail with Klippons that we use.

Cheers Steve

There is a reason for not using crimp throughs and that is on single cables installed in conduit or trunking can not be relied upon to pull through without causing damage to the connection etc etc.

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Thanks for the quick replies Applaud Smiley

So these would be fine then,

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/2-LEVER-WAGO-ELECTRIC-CONNECTOR-x-50_W0QQitemZ290315839277QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_DIY_Material_Electrical_Fittings_MJ?hash=item43982c272d&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

Would these be ok to be used when the NICEIC inspector comes out to see my work, would they be happy that I have used this method?

100% fine unless you need more than 32A as Ian says

:D

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100% fine unless you need more than 32A as Ian says

:D

Thanks again for the replies and sorry to be a PITA but would these not be better due to the fact that the enclosure has a 2 screws to gain entry and at least it would give me a bit moer piece of mind due to being more tamper proof and not as easy to disconect the wires from.

http://www.ryness.co.uk/ProductDetails.aspx?CategoryID=669&Category4ID=1&ProductID=3231

And once again would these pass a NICEIC inspection? Blushing

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Did a couple of consumer unit installs on a pair of neighbours where both c/u wouldn't fit where the origianl fuse box was. I used through crimps and put all the cables inside some 50x50 trunking straight to the top of the c/u I found I can then cut part of the bottom out of the trunking and most of the cut outs from the c/u so plenty of easy cable entry whilst maintaing the ip rating of the consumer unit, even when not crimping I always do this on a c/u change, customers love it as well as looks very tidy and proffesional compared to clipped to the wall.

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I have used those for shower circuit extensions on cu replacements but the wago ones will sit nicely inside the cu (assuming you haven't got a ultra small one ;) ) so no need for screws to remove it.

If you do not have enough cable to get it inside the cu then maybe look at a wagobox (box specially designed for wago's). They even do conectors to allow the connectors to be mounted on din rails.

Never had an NICEIC inspection but can't see why they would not like them.

Ian.

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Some like crimps (how much room have you got?)

Some use terminal blocks

Some use push connectors eg Wago, but Andyc linked to some nice cheap ones here

I always use the red, blue and yellow through crimps when I replace a consumer unit as I think the job looks really professional. When I have to extend a cable bigger than 6mm then I do look for other options. Personally I have never been keen on connector blocks and tape.

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I always use the red, blue and yellow through crimps when I replace a consumer unit as I think the job looks really professional. When I have to extend a cable bigger than 6mm then I do look for other options. Personally I have never been keen on connector blocks and tape.

Do you heatshrink over the crimps?

Have you seen the crimps with the heatshrink built in?

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Do you heatshrink over the crimps?

Have you seen the crimps with the heatshrink built in?

No and no but that sounds like a good idea for additional insulation. What provides the heat ? -- not a blowlamp I hope :^O

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No and no but that sounds like a good idea for additional insulation. What provides the heat ? -- not a blowlamp I hope :^O

This type of thing

:D

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