Jump to content

Beko DRCS76W Tumble Dyer [No power]


Learning_On_The_Job
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone

 

>Put the dryer on, no problems. Walk back in a while later and its dead.

>Not the socket or fuse in the plug.

>Open it up and look at the anti-Interference filter. Slightly sticky on one side with some burning. Plastic crumbles away on one side, revealing a broken wire. Replace it.

>Still dead, no lights.

 

So I’m thinking now what. I don’t have a multimeter on me, is there anything else I can try without ?

 

I think I put the wires to the switch and filter back correctly, but did I ? (lol)

Is it likely to be the PCB (what else can it be) ?

Beside ordering a PCB and trying it, can I test this without a multimeter and how ? If I get hold of a multimeter how do I test it (where are the probes going) ?

Any other repair ideas are welcome

 

Dryer model

https://i.imgur.com/rOEOT7Y.jpg

 

Old interference filter

https://i.imgur.com/Y4xhivC.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/niZoMOE.jpg

 

New filter

https://i.imgur.com/xKVOxJO.jpg

 

Switch

https://i.imgur.com/FrjGXAg.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/EGeztUR.jpg

 

PCB

https://i.imgur.com/ozqdKuX.jpg

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I doubt if the filter was the issue in the first place. It looks to me like it probably stopped suppressing but the IN and OUT connections were on the same terminals. 

Could be anything I'm afraid, overheat or control thermostats, control switch or PCB, but without any test gear you can't tell. Sorry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An afterthought; That filter blowing could easily have taken out the fuse. You are sure you replaced it with a serviceable spare ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Geoff1946 said:

I doubt if the filter was the issue in the first place. It looks to me like it probably stopped suppressing but the IN and OUT connections were on the same terminals. 

Could be anything I'm afraid, overheat or control thermostats, control switch or PCB, but without any test gear you can't tell. Sorry.

 

2 hours ago, Geoff1946 said:

An afterthought; That filter blowing could easily have taken out the fuse. You are sure you replaced it with a serviceable spare ?

 

Didnt have a multimeter at the time, so changed the interreference filter because one of the live terminals appeared broken, accompanied by slight stickiness and burning. Relatively cheap, so was hoping for an easy fix, but it either wasnt it, or there seems to be something else as well. 

 

I've since bought a cheap multimeter (Im inevitably always trying to fix something someone else breaks so im sure it will come in handy). I'm getting 240 volts from the plug, to filter, to switch and out of it. 

The red/yellow & orange /yellowpurple wires from the switch then go to the motor I think. Few wires go with them from the PCB with them, few wires come back up to the PCB. Something appears wrong on the way to the motor, or between the motor and PCB, or at least thats where I'm up to. I wonder what it could be. A lot of these wires are difficult to probe due to their plastic connectors. 

 

So im pondering what else to try now, what I can get access to and probe, or what other parts it could be

 

What should I try from here. AC current or continuity ?

 

So what should I probe for 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kind of messed up the ending to the above post and cant find where to edit. But basically, any advice on what parts to check now, or what, and how to probe, would be appreciated. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Firstly, be really careful probing mains voltage with a cheap multimeter. It is very easy to cause a short circuit with the probes, which often have a long exposed section at the end. 

There is also little protection if you should select the wrong range.

It's impossible to give detailed electrical fault finding advice without having any circuit diagram.

What you can do is isolate the dryer from the mains, locate the control and overheat thermostats and check their continuity with your meter.

Those thermostats are usually circular, about 20mm diameter with a couple of terminals stuck out. There will be at least two, maybe three.

Next, check the door switch is operating correctly. There is usually a microswitch involved, sometimes two, which can fail electrically or can move out of position. 

Visually inspect the circuit board for burned components, tracks or connections.

Finally, how old is it? If it is getting on a bit the brushes in the motor may be worn out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How old is the appliance?

 

(googling some other Beko faults suggests the DRCS76W was around in 2013)..

 

As a general rule if an appliance is getting on for 6 or 7 years old..

it can be cheaper and less hassle just to replace...

 

And/Or if its Beko..  still probably cheaper and less hassle just to replace...

 

As Geoff suggests..

if you don't really know what you are doing..  poking around inside a live appliance, can be a very hazardous activity.

 

(Electricity can kill a healthy adult in well under a second)..

 

Try googling for some appliance wiring diagrams..

and then..

if you understand them you can start a bit of testing..

then use places like e-spares to source any possible faulty components..

 

But.. if you cant get any diagrams or you don't understand them..

then I would recommend you walk away!

 

:C  

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Geoff1946 said:

Firstly, be really careful probing mains voltage with a cheap multimeter. It is very easy to cause a short circuit with the probes, which often have a long exposed section at the end. 

There is also little protection if you should select the wrong range.

It's impossible to give detailed electrical fault finding advice without having any circuit diagram.

What you can do is isolate the dryer from the mains, locate the control and overheat thermostats and check their continuity with your meter.

Those thermostats are usually circular, about 20mm diameter with a couple of terminals stuck out. There will be at least two, maybe three.

Next, check the door switch is operating correctly. There is usually a microswitch involved, sometimes two, which can fail electrically or can move out of position. 

Visually inspect the circuit board for burned components, tracks or connections.

Finally, how old is it? If it is getting on a bit the brushes in the motor may be worn out.

Dryer was built in 2011 I think. So its getting on a bit. Its annoying me because I can usually fix everything, washers, laptops, vacuums etc but I dont have as much experience with condenser dryers or a multimeter so im learning and struggling to pin point the problem beyond the switch. I've been measuring the AC on 600, continuity with the continuity setting. I'm being careful with what im touching, its earthed, and I unplug it etc. What is winding me up, is if I can say 'right, its definitely X, £80 for a new PCB' or whatever, than I can weigh it up, replace or buy another, admit defeat, make a decision. But because of the way I am, I kind of want to diagnose it, and also make sure im not replacing it if the fix is relatively cheap and im missing it. This dryer is a learning experience for me, I'll be better for it when the next breaks. 

 

Theres no obvious or major burning or damage else where. I need to do more testing, but I suspect something around and between the motor, or the PCB. I'll try to figure out whats going where, and see what continuity and AC im getting, try to rule things out, try to figure out where power is getting to, and where its stopping. Struggling to find circuit diagrams. The thermostats on the heating element and the little circular one in the drum have continuity. I'll check the door switch. Theres one very small spot of carbon build up, anywhere, across from the PCB on the dryer frame, but theres nothing on the PCB, front or back, it looks new. 

 

 

14 hours ago, SPECIAL LOCATION said:

How old is the appliance?

 

(googling some other Beko faults suggests the DRCS76W was around in 2013)..

 

As a general rule if an appliance is getting on for 6 or 7 years old..

it can be cheaper and less hassle just to replace...

 

And/Or if its Beko..  still probably cheaper and less hassle just to replace...

 

As Geoff suggests..

if you don't really know what you are doing..  poking around inside a live appliance, can be a very hazardous activity.

 

(Electricity can kill a healthy adult in well under a second)..

 

Try googling for some appliance wiring diagrams..

and then..

if you understand them you can start a bit of testing..

then use places like e-spares to source any possible faulty components..

 

But.. if you cant get any diagrams or you don't understand them..

then I would recommend you walk away!

 

:C  

 

In terms of hassle and cost of replacing, as with my reply to geoff really. Annoys me Im struggling to find the fault, and I want to reach a point where I have a price to fix versus replace the unit. 

 

I tried to find wiring diagrams but theyre few and far between. Seems like companies have monetized wiring diagrams, only released to trade paying subs, maybe only their own engineers etc from what I've read. So visually I'm figuring out what goes where, what it does, then probing. I dont feel like repairing this is beyond my ability or ability to learn, but I am learning and hindered by the lack of information. Beko and other brands should put details parts and wiring information out there included in their instruction manuals. Beko seem to have a pretty decent parts store, but what use is it if youre struggling to fault find. 

 

I'll get my head around the wiring first. Probe. Try to rule things out, hopefully narrow it down. Might have to accept defeat this time and buy another. First appliance that has ever defeated me. I'm not sure whats wrong exactly at this point, but maybe the appliance has reached that age of no return, maybe its just not cost effective to repair or deal with the hassle much longer. I'll see. 

 

Thanks for the replies

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do sympathise with your views about service data. I too try to fix everything I can and have suffered from unavailability of circuits all my life!

Just one more (perhaps daft), thought.-

You hadn't said it was a condensing type. Does it use cold water for condensing?  If so, did you turn on the water again?   Maybe there is a pressure switch to ensure water available before starting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quick update. Spent some time getting my head around the circuit. Tested cables to parts, parts, cables to the next part. Drawn towards the PCB. Learned about how the PCB functions, parts on it, and how to test them. I’m almost certain the PCB is the problem, beside running out of things to test that were broken, the D4 resistor is broken on the PCB, possibly other parts but havent tested them all yet. I’ll test the PCB more throughly, I might solder a new resistor, if its the only part broken and I can find a spare. But at least I’ve narrowed it down. I can take a somewhat informed decision on fixing or replacing it now. Getting rid of a dryer with the niggling doubt I missed a cheap fix would have bugged me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://i.imgur.com/7rjanjr.jpg The worst of the damage was also hidden, hairline crack visual from the top of the board, barely noticeable, easy to glance over it. Its R4, not D4 as I posted above. 

https://i.imgur.com/A5YU3uu.jpg The black substance was being almost completely obscured by the resistor. It hasnt damaged the part next to it, thats just cosmetic.

 

I’ve started to learn you can trace parts along the circuit to see whats working and what isnt, so I'm still doing that. 

 

Considering how cheap these resistors are, im tempted to try one. Just to see if this does fix it, if anything. I wonder what type the resistor is though. It looks very similar to ‘Through Hole Wirewound Resistors, 3W, ± 5%, Axial Leaded Extra Small Size’, but they come in various resistance.

 

Any ideas where I can find out what resistance I would need, and is this the correct resistor ?

Edited by Learning_On_The_Job
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is that semiconductor OK?  On the photo it looks like there is a hole in it. 

 

It's difficult to ascertain component values once the codes have burned off, as with that resistor.  It doesn't look like a wirewound to me though. Probably about a 1 watt composition type. Sight of a replacement board would of course give an answer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Geoff1946 said:

Is that semiconductor OK?  On the photo it looks like there is a hole in it. 

 

It's difficult to ascertain component values once the codes have burned off, as with that resistor.  It doesn't look like a wirewound to me though. Probably about a 1 watt composition type. Sight of a replacement board would of course give an answer.

 

The blue one or the little black one ? I think the blue one must have carbon on it from the resistor blowing. I've scratched through it, no hole. Its got continuity, everything has got continuity beside this dead resistor it seems. 

 

So my next mission is to identify and find out the specification of this little green resistor in the R4 slot, so I can try it if theyre cheap. If it fixes it, great, if not, then I'm almost certain its new PCB versus replacing the unit. I'm looking for pictures of PCB's, but cant find anything high definition enough to see the markings, I have a feeling they're underneath the resistor as well. I've emailed Beko, they'll probably reply with 'We sell PCB's, we cant help you'. 

 

But if anyone can help me identify this resistor, I'd appreciate it. Here's a couple of pictures to hopefully help

7rjanjr.jpeg

oD3c83K.jpg 

 

Thanks for the replies Geoff. I'll check back now and again to see if anyone can help with the resistor 

Edited by Learning_On_The_Job
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm looking at the square black device with three connections, labelled U4. It looks to me to have a hole in it which suggests it is , lets say, goosed.  The hole suggests that its works have exploded.

I can't fully make out the number on it, but it looks like 78**** and MAY be a voltage regulator.

IF it is, it was responsible for supplying a regulated voltage to the electronics.  Does the burned resistor connect to this device?  If so which terminal, and where does the other end of the resistor connect to?

The black unit on the corner of the board is a transformer, apparently providing a 12 volt supply to the nearby diodes and capacitors, so there should be around 15volts  DC there.

NB> The blue part is  a capacitor and should NOT have continuity, but you can't test it in circuit as you don't know what's wired across it.

 

Please realise that we are clutching at straws trying to fix a board like this but I do admire your tenacity. How much is a replacement board?

Edited by Geoff1946
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you actually measured the value of the resistor you seem the think is faulty?

Whilst it has clearly got a bit warm...

 

Is it actually open circuit?

 

I would suspect something else has failed causing the resistor to get a bit too warm...

 

Resistors are generally quite robust components that can take a bit of abuse...

And I would have thought there would be more visible damage on the PCB itself if a resistor failure was the primary problem..

 

As Geoff said not all components should show a continuity with a multi meter..

And other components are pretty much impossible to test whilst still in circuit due to all sorts of parallel paths..

 

especially if you don't have the manufactures data to check with.

 

Quote

 

Learned about how the PCB functions,


 

 

What have you actually learned about the function of the PCB...

 

Do you know what all the the plug connectors pins should be doing?

Functions, expected voltages in/out etc...

 

:C

       

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Geoff1946 said:

I'm looking at the square black device with three connections, labelled U4. It looks to me to have a hole in it which suggests it is , lets say, goosed.  The hole suggests that its works have exploded.

I can't fully make out the number on it, but it looks like 78**** and MAY be a voltage regulator.

IF it is, it was responsible for supplying a regulated voltage to the electronics.  Does the burned resistor connect to this device?  If so which terminal, and where does the other end of the resistor connect to?

The black unit on the corner of the board is a transformer, apparently providing a 12 volt supply to the nearby diodes and capacitors, so there should be around 15volts  DC there.

NB> The blue part is  a capacitor and should NOT have continuity, but you can't test it in circuit as you don't know what's wired across it.

 

Please realise that we are clutching at straws trying to fix a board like this but I do admire your tenacity. How much is a replacement board?

U4 and catching 78 was a good spot. Eyes better than mine by the looks of it. U1 has a circular depression in it, must have had this in mind when glancing over U4. So easy to overlook things on these.

With regard to supply regulated voltage, what the burned resistor connects to, black unit in the corner being a transformer15v there, where things lead etc are all good tangible things to check.

With regard to clutching at straws lol. I understand. It was good to narrow the problem down to the PCB, I cant see it being anything else. Just thought I could perhaps fix the PCB, and I like doing this kind of stuff as well.


 

Thanks for the time, help and patience.

 

 

 

45 minutes ago, SPECIAL LOCATION said:

Have you actually measured the value of the resistor you seem the think is faulty?

Whilst it has clearly got a bit warm...

 

Is it actually open circuit?

 

I would suspect something else has failed causing the resistor to get a bit too warm...

 

Resistors are generally quite robust components that can take a bit of abuse...

And I would have thought there would be more visible damage on the PCB itself if a resistor failure was the primary problem..

 

As Geoff said not all components should show a continuity with a multi meter..

And other components are pretty much impossible to test whilst still in circuit due to all sorts of parallel paths..

 

especially if you don't have the manufactures data to check with.

 

 

What have you actually learned about the function of the PCB...

 

Do you know what all the the plug connectors pins should be doing?

Functions, expected voltages in/out etc...

 

:C

       

I’m not an electrician with 14k posts on an internet forum. So being descriptive, simplifying technical language, pointing things out, linking information to read, giving me tangible things to do that I’ll understand; is much more helpful than being inpatient, patronising and condescending.

 

In your first post, you said buy a new dryer. In your second post, essentially, more hassle than its worth and I'm not willing to help. I’m clearly not here to waste peoples time and I’m willing to learn, so if youve got no appetite for it, don’t reply; why are you replying. Look at all the other posts; people want to diagnose, once theyve diagnosed, they want the fix. For some, that might be just replacing the part, others might not even bother and just buy a new appliance. For me, because I like fixing things and learning, I wanted to know more about possibly fixing this PCB. If you think something else broke this PCB, beside the interference filter, we could have explored it, but you didnt, (and there doesn’t appear to be anything, beside that filter). If you were willing to teach about PCBs, I was willing to learn. What have I learned about PCB’s ? not much lol ! But thats what you were saying wasnt it, and is it ever wonder with your posts. 'Learned’ obviously stuck out for you, replace it with ‘learning’ if you’d feel better.

 

However, I know more than I knew last Tuesday. My knowledge of wiring and parts inside condenser dryers has improved. I’m in a better position to diagnose and fix a dryer in future. So posting here hasnt been entirely useless because I've learned bits from Geoff who's been good enough to try and help out. 

 

With regard to the PCB, I’m ‘LEARNING’. Theres a lot to learn in electronics, theres gaps in my knowledge. Sure I could spend £80 on another, or buy another £200, 300, 750 pound dryer. But what if I could buy a fivers worth of resisters, fix it, and learn a thing or two along the way……. I don’t get any negativity or impatience towards this. If you cant be arsed helping or furthering my knowledge, don’t reply. To answer your question, yes the resistor is courgetteed, its been tested. Geoff pointed out U4, along with various other tangible things to check. If I replace R4 and U4, will I fix it, who knows, I'll test further, maybe try it out, I’m learning……..

 

Wish me luck messing around with the PCB. I'll wish you luck with your next 14k posts. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of UseWe have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.