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Assessment Job


sellers

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Is a new circuit 20a mcb, feeding an rcd protected s/o in a porch a good enough job to show. It is classed as a major job, and I have a few minors that I could use as a second job.

The 2.5 cable comes out of the CU, under the floor for about 1 foot, then into the solid floored porch. Running down the bottom of the wall in mini trunking to an RCD socket at the end of the porch.

The 20a mcb is fine as the cable isn't buried in a wall, etc. and the RCD socket was in place due to the old lady using it to mow her lawn with.

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Why not chase out and bury the cable in the wall? would look a million times better. And what scheme are you going with?

AndyGuiness Drink

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sorry its elecsa.

the porch had tiled walls and the customer didnt want me to damage them.

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is it a first assesment? if so they may want to see a bit more. but phone them and ask if it is enough.

I did a cu change at my house and they were happy with that.

paul

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I'd class that as a minor job..

For a major they want a CU change (inc ME & PEB's) and new circuit(s) at least..

I nearly failed an assessment once for only having a CU change and one new circuit as my major

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Echo that ... CCU minimum ... I had a CU change and a new external lighting circuit for my initial assessment ... a colleague presented a CU change only and passed ... if you're in doubt give the tech line a call and tell them what you propose to do and they'll tell you if it's enough ...

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During an a assessment does the assessor watch you do a job from start to finish, or do they assess a job that you have already completed and make you explain what you did and why?

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During an a assessment does the assessor watch you do a job from start to finish, or do they assess a job that you have already completed and make you explain what you did and why?

you go to the job and they are assessing your workmanship, form filling etc. They will ask you questions about what you did and why you did something a certian way. They may get you to repeat tests and hopefully you get the same answer as on the certificate the customer got!

They will ask you questions you know and also expect you to be able to find answers in that BRB of yours.

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During an a assessment does the assessor watch you do a job from start to finish, or do they assess a job that you have already completed and make you explain what you did and why?

When I did my first one I had to show a first fix ie extension and two second fixes. But this was before part p came in. Its probably changed now.

Batty

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During an a assessment does the assessor watch you do a job from start to finish, or do they assess a job that you have already completed and make you explain what you did and why?

There would still appear to be some confusion when it comes to assesments.

For clarification, an assesment for the Domestic installer scheme is carried out on two jobs that you have done in the last twelve months.

These Jobs can be chosen by you, after all you have to ensure excess on the day of assesment.

The jobs you have done will have to be completed, and the relative electrical installation or minor works certificates will have had to be completed.

The assesment will always follow a strict guidline.

A Safe working practice.

B Safe isolation

C Knowledge of the wiring and construction methods

D Selection and use of protection devises

E Position and use of switching for emergency or functional isolation.

F labbeling and instructions including danger notices.

G Testing procedures, and recorded details

H filling out the required electrical certificate, with all fields completed.

One of the assesment jobs will have to show

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H

The other one will have to show

A,B,D,F and H

This is just a guidline and should never be taken as a rule of thumb, as every assesor would require different things.

To comply with the regulations for assesment purposes, the assesor has to be able to see your potential, your knowledge, and the use of your knowledge.

If you give the assesor a limited job, with very little electrical know how, the job of assesing your potential, or your knowledge is diminished.

Having said that, it is by no means impossible.

I always show full rewires, it shows my capability for design, use of all the relevent building regs Part B, part L, Part p, Part ??? and others.

Testing is far easier for a full rewire or a new build, because part of the testing is done before its connected to the supply.( or if not should be).

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.....

To comply with the regulations for assesment purposes, the assesor has to be able to see your potential, your knowledge, and the use of your knowledge.

If you give the assesor a limited job, with very little electrical know how, the job of assesing your potential, or your knowledge is diminished.

Having said that, it is by no means impossible.

Concur;)

IMHO a less complex job would by its very nature require far more verbal questioning & evaluation of theoretical knowledge in order to ascertain competence.

Where as..

just looking at a new CU or rewire, immediately answers a lot of questions without them ever being asked...

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Nice post GH!

Scoob worthy - whatever happened to them?

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Nice post GH!

Scoob worthy - whatever happened to them?

Off in the Mystery Machine with Sha9gy, Velma, Daphne & Fred I think????:|Blushing:coat

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Off in the Mystery Machine with Sha9gy, Velma, Daphne & Fred I think????:|Blushing:coat

a sha9 is a sea bird!

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I personally think a consumer unit change is not enough for an assessment it cannot show your skills as an electrician. An extension or full rewire is more what is needed but the problem with part p you cannot do this easily without being registered so its a vicious circle.

Batty

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True, but the competence of someone can come accross in an interview. With them knowing all the relevent rules and regulations.

You may not see the way they do their installations, but you may know, that they know exactly what they are doing?

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My first assessment was a CU changes and a Full rewire!:|

From my experience NIC do like a cooker circuit for doing any R1+R2, Zs & Ze Ins-Res readings on!

Easy to isolate, if others are in the property doesn't cause too much inconvenience!;):)

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My first assessment was a CU changes and a Full rewire!:|

From my experience NIC do like a cooker circuit for doing any R1+R2, Zs & Ze Ins-Res readings on!

Easy to isolate, if others are in the property doesn't cause too much inconvenience!;):)

I would agree with that, I always have to do the cooker circuit on assesment, never thought of it before :P, and I hate big wires :^O

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True, but the competence of someone can come accross in an interview. With them knowing all the relevent rules and regulations.

You may not see the way they do their installations, but you may know, that they know exactly what they are doing?

This is true. Was talking to a guy from Elecsa at Elex last week and he said that the assessor knows pretty quickly whether you're up to the job and if you're fit to actually be doing it.

Seems to be that some muppets still slip through somehow.

My CU is all done now, bonding all installed and tested. Just need to sort out the meter tail protection. Stumped up

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