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supplementry bonding in kitchens


sonasardar

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Hi quite new on these forums,i,m easing my way into the trade,can someone please advise if bonding still reqd in kitchens ,will be protected by rcd/rcbo..thanks in avance.

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Hello sonasardar...

Welcome:D

Page 31 On-Site-Guide....

4.6 Additional protection - supplementary equipotentail bonding.

Supplementary equipotential bonding is required in some of the locations and installations or Part7 of BS7671.

If the installation meets the requirements for earthing and bonding, there is no specific requirement in BS7671 for supplementary bonding of:

  • Kitchen pipes, sinks or draining boards.
  • Metallic boiler pipework.
  • Metal furniture in kitchens.
  • Metallic pipes to wash hand basins & WC's.
  • Locations containing a bath or shower, providing the requirements o 701.415.2 are met.

Note metallic waste pipes in contact with earth must be bonded to the main earth terminal as they are extraneous conductive parts.

Is where you need to refer to.

;)Guiness Drink

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Generally on commercial kitchens supp bonding will still be installed.

Batty

This in normally because commercial kitchens are often installed by non electricians.

I have seen it done and because its commercial or industrial the average joe connects all servises without any calculation or regard, and providing a suitable certificate is issued there is nothing we can do about it.

Even if the certificate contains readings that are from the times of Merlin and the round table ie Ficticous

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I usually supp bond commercial kitchens due to large expanses of stainless steel worktops and splash backs in case of short to metal work, but was never really sure if it is required.

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This in normally because commercial kitchens are often installed by non electricians.

I have seen it done and because its commercial or industrial the average joe connects all servises without any calculation or regard, and providing a suitable certificate is issued there is nothing we can do about it.

Even if the certificate contains readings that are from the times of Merlin and the round table ie Ficticous

A lot of the gear will not be RCD protected so supp bonding is an extra safeguard where as domestic stuff now generally will have total RCD protection if its done to 17th.

Batty

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Maybe not a requirement but it has always been considered 'good practise' to supp bond kitchen sinks. ;)

I would not do it now but I think its good that they were bonded on two occasions customers have got belts of sinks in kitchens due to faults although one may have been static the other was a definite fault. But bonding sinks is hard work when they are already in.

Batty

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As Special Location said, there is no requirement if ADS is the main method of fault protection otherwise it will be EEBADS and then it will be required.

Personally I see nothing wrong with doing the supplementary bonding anyway as RCD's can fail.

The question to ask yourself is possibly,.... ".... is there a reasonable chance that this metalwork will ever become live under fault conditions ?" ... or ".. is there a reasonable chance of a difference in potential across this metalwork?"..... if you feel the answer is "yes" then put the bonding in.

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For new installations or alterations / additions in a location containing a bath or shower, supplementary bonding will not be required if:

 The disconnection times required by Section 411 of BS 7671 are met, and

 All circuits are protected by RCD

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For new installations or alterations / additions in a location containing a bath or shower, supplementary bonding will not be required if:

 The disconnection times required by Section 411 of BS 7671 are met, and

 All circuits are protected by RCD

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I have wired a few commercial kitchens in my time and some industrial food prep areas.

Most are in stainless steel and bonding was carried out on all work surfaces, lighting trunking, and so forth.

Given the new regulations 17th and additional protection required for cables buried less than 50mm, it would be fair to say that providing all conditions are met there would be no need to supplementary bond.

However I agree that most older installations that whilst not up to the current regulations, should be supplementary bonded to acheive the required protection and disconnection times as per the regulations.

My theory? if in doubt bond it out.

However be carefull not to raise any potential higher than it was before you bond.

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