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what 'extra' is expected during a rewire?


zeff737

Question

hi you lot, ive wondered this for some time and soon im going to have to know the answer...so.....

When doing a domestic rewire, are we expected to move the the furniture, lift and relay the carpets and plaster back where we have chased out?

cheers.

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I was doing a c/u change a while ago and needed some furniture moving to check sockets etc. Homeowner was an old guy who had oxygen to help him breathe. I had to be a bit firm with him in the end to tell him to sit down and let me move furniture as I was worried he was going to have a heart attack or something as he went blue at one point!! Normally I just move what needs moving and ask customer to move things for me as well, depends on customer and on what needs moving etc.

Also have been doing a couple of jobs for a customer where they have done all the chasing and filling. Got another job with them to price where they want a load of new sockets all over the downstairs and they are doing all the chasings and filling for that as well - if only all customers would do that its sooo much easier!!

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I don't think I have ever " Raggled" Or have I ? Is it yet another course we are supposed to attend . C&Gs in Raggling. Or is it one of those strange Scottish practices like skirling pipes ? :P

Chasing

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hi you lot, ive wondered this for some time and soon im going to have to know the answer...so.....

When doing a domestic rewire, are we expected to move the the furniture, lift and relay the carpets and plaster back where we have chased out?

cheers.

IMHO 99% of jobs... excluding the really really small & simple stuff, need to be assessed by a detailed site visit.

At which point a formal acceptance of what work you will do, or not do can be agreed.

Unless you know what the customer is expecting you to do... you cannot give a reasonable quote!? so "extras" don't really come up:|

I normally write the main schedule of work i.e. the electrical bits to be install.

then put a list of bullet point notes.. such as

  • All accessories to be flush/surface mounted etc..
  • All cables to be hidden in fabric of building/clipped to surface/trunking etc..
  • All Chases to be filled/left for plasterer.
  • Carpets to be left rolled for later refit/laid flat/tacked etc..
  • Lino floors, adhesive floor tiles, laminate floor cannot be lifted without some damage, If damage is not accepted they must be lifted prior to work commencing.
    etc..
    etc..

You would mutually agree these sort of points based on the property/owners/any future proposed building alterations etc.. etc..

(often people are having rewires cuz of other major building works!)

:D

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I hate domestic rewires but we all need to earn a living so, yes we move furiture, yes we re-plaster, no to laminate flooring. We have a pre-printed statement that says we will relay carpets but recommend they get a professional . Oh and a disclaimer on the subject of foam backed carpets disintegrating when lifted.

Ah! :):D

got that T-shirt DekeBlushing:x

those are the ones that give a three dimensional scale model of the lake district, Himalayas, the Alps etc...?:D:);\

:coat

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All depends on what you price up for and what the customer is like.

If the customer is capable, i tend to ask them to clear as much clutter as possible so there is bare minimum around, i dont mind moving the odd bit of furnature

I also inform them

i am NOT a plasterer, but i can get one in to price the work up as this is not included in my price. (id never try plastering either LOL)

Carpets, i hate!

Laminte flooring, i walk out! i wont rewire a house thats got laminte down (unless downstairs)

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Whenever possible, I get the occupier to move their own furniture as I feel moving it myself makes me vulnerable to compensation claims for damaged items.

Yes, I lift carpets and replace them to the best of my ability. I rarely get any comebacks.

Occasionally I meet customers who are willing to both move furniture AND lift carpets which saves me a lot of time.

No plastering !.... I get someone else to do that.... or the occupant does.

These things definitely need clarifying with the customer before a price is agreed on as the job will take a lot longer if the electrician needs to do all those things.

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Likewise with most of the guys, Nightmare... you go to see the job and faced with old couple who have been in the house for thirty years filling every space possible with very pretty and very breakable ornaments, pictures, mirrors etc.

It adds a huge amount of time. Shifting furniture from one room to the other then back again, carpets need doing sometimes. Will do it all as required and always consider the time factor when quoting for jobs like this.

At least one person made this point, but be very wary of the punter who tells you they are going to be your labourer and move all furniture, lift floor boards, raggle walls etc. In my experience they very seldom do and when they do, they can just get in your way. Takes them 45 mins to lift a floorboard, longer to do a raggle and you generally have to finish it off when it comes to boxing out anyway.

A definate knack to the old raggling and it becomes very trying, very quickly to the uninitiated! When they spit the first bit of brick out of their teeth they usually, very suddenly, find something very important to buy at the shops!

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Just to clarify i use a plasterer, its in the estimate about furniture, floors etc. No liability accepted or they do it, just try to get them to be reasonable. Its all about expectations do they expect the same thing as you? Try very hard not to walk away from work as there isnt so much about at the moment, although my current 6 days a week seems to say otherwise

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All depends on what you price up for and what the customer is like.

If the customer is capable, i tend to ask them to clear as much clutter as possible so there is bare minimum around, i dont mind moving the odd bit of furnature

I also inform them

i am NOT a plasterer, but i can get one in to price the work up as this is not included in my price. (id never try plastering either LOL)

Carpets, i hate!

Laminte flooring, i walk out! i wont rewire a house thats got laminte down (unless downstairs)

Thats a very good point, what if it is laminate or even a tiled floor in a kitchen or bathroom, how are we reasonably suposed to do the job without causing at least some damage?

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I do not do laminate floors unless the client lifts them, I will take no responsibility for any damaged.

I urge clients to move as much furniture as possible, however I am very flexible, especially when it comes to aged people, or infirm etc.

Your quotation should always reflect the amount of time to do the job, this gives you a labour charge and any profit margin.

If you spend most of your time as a furniture removal man and not an electrician, you will have to charge accordingly, otherwise you end up out of pocket.

I have no problems with lifting carpets and never had any complaints so far, however if a client says it does not matter if you rip it or stanly knife it make sure you get it in writing, just for chance they change their minds, or a reletive tells them they can sue you for a new carpet.

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I don't think I have ever " Raggled" Or have I ? Is it yet another course we are supposed to attend . C&Gs in Raggling. Or is it one of those strange Scottish practices like skirling pipes ? :P

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I try to avoid occupied re-wires - its just too much hassle and it kills your back, however when it does happen I make it clear that I only rough fill chases and a plasterer in needed. As for laminte flooring and tiled floors, the only real answer is to go surface, preferably in the more decorative half-moon trunking which blends into the skirting boards resonably well.

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I hate domestic rewires but we all need to earn a living so, yes we move furiture, yes we re-plaster, no to laminate flooring. We have a pre-printed statement that says we will relay carpets but recommend they get a professional . Oh and a disclaimer on the subject of foam backed carpets disintegrating when lifted.

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Generally I do my own plastering as I enjoy it unless its a total refurbishment.

Moving furniture is another thing, generally I allow time in my quote to take carpets up and move furniture but if customer helps I would take that of final bill. The worst thing is if customer says they will do it but then don't and it hold you up.

Batty

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Raggling is indeed a pain but we are generally expected to do it north of the border usually a plasterer will back fill the walls though

PS can someone have a look at my last post on "fancey bathroom 2 " - I'd Like some opinions.

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I do not do laminate floors unless the client lifts them, I will take no responsibility for any damaged.

I urge clients to move as much furniture as possible, however I am very flexible, especially when it comes to aged people, or infirm etc.

Your quotation should always reflect the amount of time to do the job, this gives you a labour charge and any profit margin.

If you spend most of your time as a furniture removal man and not an electrician, you will have to charge accordingly, otherwise you end up out of pocket.

I have no problems with lifting carpets and never had any complaints so far, however if a client says it does not matter if you rip it or stanly knife it make sure you get it in writing, just for chance they change their minds, or a reletive tells them they can sue you for a new carpet.

This happened to a Decorator that I know, one of his customers told him not to worry about putting dust sheets down when painting hall/stairs/landing. When the job was finished the customers wife complained about the paint damage to the carpet. Luckily they still payed him for the work completed as he told them they would be covered on his Public liability insurance.

However the claim didnt go through after he told his insurance what had happened.

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Remember people whilst all works are being carried out on any premises you as the contractor are fully responsible.

This means that you will have to look at all your insurance documents to find any restrictions or clauses in your work.

I have public liabilty insurance to the value of 10 million however if an employee or member of the public are injured or incurr losses at a depth of more than 1 mtr my insurance will not pay out, I only know this because I have read my policy statements.

In 20 years I have never had to make any claim(touching wood) but I have learned never to be complacent and always get the clients signature if needed.

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