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Teach me - Floodlights!


sellers

Question

ok, so been doing a job re-lamping, replacing damaged ballasts and ignitors on a local floodlit sports centre. The jobs fine replacing like for like except winching down the towers is starting to get to my back.

Anyway I just wondered if anyone could explain the setup within these lamp-posts as I did ask quite an experienced guy at work and he hadn't seen it before either.

Take one lamppost with 6 x 2000w SON HQI-T floodlights on.

The incoming is 4 3phase swa's. No neutrals. Each one to an 3 phase isolator (4 again). This then splits up into 6x2 phase 45a MCB's. (Never really seen a 2 phase mcb)

Out of these the 2 phases then go throught the ballast, ignitior (with a capacitor tapped off it) then upto the light.

My questions are, how do you have 2 phases on a lamp. No neutrals, etc. Just after a bit of indepth information really.

O)

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Sorry I dont think they're sons, more metal halide. Allthough Im not 100% clued up on lamp types.

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they may be 400v.

MH: white

SON: golden tint

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Hi have a look at this link of a pdf data sheet here some of the units are for 415 v operation.

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And any Two (2) Phases = 400 V, as you know, Sir. :D

just hope its not split phase

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Just struggling to comprehend how a lamp can take 2 phases. They must be balanced to have no neutral, right?

these are the lamps

Osram%20Powerstar%202000w%20HQI-T-I%20lamp.jpg

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Just struggling to comprehend how a lamp can take 2 phases. They must be balanced to have no neutral, right?

these are the lamps

Osram%20Powerstar%202000w%20HQI-T-I%20lamp.jpg

your connecting between 2 phases, no neutral is needed. think of how a delta transformer is wired - each of the coils in there can be replaced with a ballast. they do not need to be balanced

and that lamp looks like SON

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they do not need to be balanced

It's the old potential difference... they need to be out of ballance (on different phases) to make a circuit.

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