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create a split load


paul b b

Question

Evening gents,

A customer has his own cu that he got ages ago but it only had 1 rcd so i nee to put another in.

i have not done this before so just wanted to confirm on what to do.

i have attaced a pic of his board

i was thinking rcd 68302-98 page 239 in sf and51990-98 page 240 in sf

but where is the best place to put them?

thanks

paul

post-4120-134963554388_thumb.jpg

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17 answers to this question

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Andy™

tell him to get a new board. or use RCBO's. or you just need another RCD & few bits of cable

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yeah i did try to sell him a new one but as he has it.

he want to go the second rcd route as its the cheapest.

i just want to confirm where i put the split load kit.

thanks

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Andy™

to the right of the main isolator

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so put the new rcd next to the main switch.

secont rcd live feed from main switch.

but what about the netral bars it looks like metal bars goint to the netral

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Andy™

you will only need 2 neutral bars, the current bar fed direct from isolator will be changed to fed from the new RCD. you will also have to move neutral feed for second existing RCD to isolator and not existing neutral bar

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thanks andy

do you know if the sf parts i nee are the correct ones?

i hate wasting profit on wrong bits

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whilst on the subject, can i re jig the board? to say main switch-rcd-mcb-mcb-mcb-rcd-mcb-mcb etc?

to do this is it best to get 2 split load kits and do away with the existing bars?

thanks

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I don't think I would be happy converting that board if anything where to go wrong you would be liable. The only way you could safely make that work is by using Rcbo's on main switch side.

Batty

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whilst on the subject, can i re jig the board? to say main switch-rcd-mcb-mcb-mcb-rcd-mcb-mcb etc?

to do this is it best to get 2 split load kits and do away with the existing bars?

thanks

L and N would be the wrong way around for the bus bar with the current RCD in the board

after all the messing your going to be better off getting a new board with dual RCD any way

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I don't think I would be happy converting that board if anything where to go wrong you would be liable. The only way you could safely make that work is by using Rcbo's on main switch side.

Batty

Surely a CU is only an enclosure with a DIN rail on which we mount and connect components?

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ok thanks chaps.

how many circuits would i need to put on rcbos to make it comply with 17th?

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Andy™

1x lighting and 1x sockets (and same again on RCD) would be a start. depends on how many circuits you already have and how they are seperated

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there are only about 5 circuits in total- its only a bunglow.

ok last question (well mabe) 2 rcbos, next to main switch? what netral bar?

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Andy™
there are only about 5 circuits in total- its only a bunglow.

ok last question (well mabe) 2 rcbos, next to main switch? what netral bar?

left bar

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Surely a CU is only an enclosure with a DIN rail on which we mount and connect components?

How can you have one isolator if you have two RCD's in it?

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thanks andy

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