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Gas Pipe Through Lv Electrical Room


viktorvasilevst

Question

Hello all,

 

We have been asked to run a gas pipe from a gas meter room(skid) down to EC supplying three boilers and CHP.  

 

The problem is that the gas pipe (125 mm) needs to run through LV electrical room(unventilated) so the question is:

 

Is this allowed to run gas pipe through electrical room?

If yes or not, is it possible somebody to quote a standard that I could check in.

 

Many thanks.

 

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13 answers to this question

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I know little of commercial gas or electrics. BS 7671 528.3.4 refers you to BS 6891 for segregation distances, which is for domestic sized gas pipes <= 35mm. So not much use.

I would think ventilation of the room would be essential, but not sure of commercial requirements.

Consider whether the gas pipe might produce condensation in use, and whether this might fall onto electrical equipment (bs7671 528.3.2)

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Also check your Gas Regulations  I'd imagine .

 

For segregation you need to look at BS 6891    I don't have access to that.

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just put it through. make sure its secure. makes it easier if there is something to cable tie the cables to

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right across the doorway??? :innocent

 

not aware of any such regs for gas in LV room, would have though ventialtion is essential at low level as gas is heavier than air, but I doubt there's any reason why you can't. Many plant rooms have gas and electrical equipment in closeish proximity. If possible avoid any joins in the same room to avoid potential leaks.

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We have to keep a 150 mm distance from gas service so I guess the same applies to you .......other than that you may have to segregate it by barrier or complete enclosure ...... you need to see the BS  or ask a consultant  really.

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Ask Trumpton?

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Why didnt i think of that?!

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Why didnt i think of that?!

Years of experience mate!

Plus , not being a proper electrician I always consult those who make the rules

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right across the doorway??? :innocent

 

not aware of any such regs for gas in LV room, would have though ventialtion is essential at low level as gas is heavier than air, but I doubt there's any reason why you can't. Many plant rooms have gas and electrical equipment in closeish proximity. If possible avoid any joins in the same room to avoid potential leaks.

Natural Gas (methane) is lighter than air (relative density 0.55) but tends to disperse evenly, high and low level vents are usually required. LPG is heavier than air and tends to pool at low level, that is why you don't see LPG boilers in basements.

They sometimes use methane in balloons, obviously not the party type.

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That would make sense in a domestic situation where the copper pipe wall is only 0.8mm thick.

 

Somehow I think the OP’s 125mmØ pipe is going to be more substantial. Probably with brazed joints, I hope so anyway.

 

Plant rooms, kilns, furnaces, etc. There’s really no way of separating them other than by the correct selection of equipment for the situation.

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This could have been a company regulation I can’t recall, it’s 30 years ago.

 

Two 8” 30PSI gas mains had really no other route than through a LV switchroom at ceiling level. They had to be continuous welded to one metre either side of the switch room. The walls grouted as seals.

 

Gas and electric often go hand in hand so I personally can’t see a problem other than solder joints in copper pipe in the switchroom.

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I think the regs governing distance between gas pipes and electrical services are more about preventing any possibility of electrical flash damage from live conductors to the pipe which will cause a leak rather than an arbitary leak causing an explosive atmosphere.

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